Medtech stories we missed this week: July 21, 2017

From Second Sight’s South Korean market entry to Sanuwave’s Indonesian distribution deal, here are medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Second Sight enters South Korea market Second Sight announced in a July 5 press release that it has entered the market in South Korea with the implantation of two

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

How Bigfoot Biomedical wants to disrupt diabetes care

Bigfoot Biomedical is a highly competitive player in medtech’s race to develop an artificial pancreas. The 50-person company has made rapid progress towards developing a smart, automated insulin delivery system since its beginnings in 2014. Just yesterday Bigfoot announced that it is partnering with Abbott, bringing together Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre glucose monitoring tech and Bigfoot’s insulin

This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered

How stem cells are creating kidney filtration on a chip

Harvard researchers have developed a glomerulus membrane to mimic the kidney’s filtration system in vitro by using engineered human stem cells. The glomerulus is a structure that has podocyte cells that tightly wrap around capillaries. The cells and the capillaries are separated by a thin membrane of extracellular matrix and between them, a filtration barrier

Medtech stories we missed this week: June 30, 2017

From ConforMIS touting its knee replacement study to Consulting Radiologists’s new breast cancer detection tool, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Study: Low-dose CT scanning improves Ankylosing Spondylitis assessment A new study has shown that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) is more sensitive than X-rays for monitoring

CMS spikes Medicare Advantage data release at the last minute

Medicare Advantage, privately run health plans paid for by Medicare, have covered an increasing number of seniors and disabled people in recent years. More than 1/3 of the 58 million Medicare beneficiaries opt for these non-traditional plans. The government has been collecting data about the care delivered to these enrollees since 2012. Last year, it

Clever catheter lets surgeons see inside arteries to trim plaque

The Pantheris catheter developed by Avinger takes the physician out of the radiation field. A clever catheter design lets cardiologists see inside arteries and precisely remove plaque from diseased tissue. The Pantheris catheter is safer than conventional radiation-guided procedures because it takes the surgeon out of the radiation field, and along with on-board optics, it

This fly’s hearing could inspire better hearing aids

A small, yellow parasitic fly called the Ormia ochracea has a sense of directional hearing that is unsurpassed to any other creature in the animal kingdom, according to new University of Toronto Scarborough research. That spectacular hearing could one day be a model for new hearing aids. “These flies have highly specialized ears that provide

This microhole chip identifies and sorts cancer cells

Fraunhofer researchers have created a microhole chip that can identify and characterize cancer cells within minutes – helping to catch metastasis before it can begin. Traditional fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) gives an estimate of the number of tumor cells in a patient’s bloodstream. If there is a higher concentration of tumor cells, there is a

This wearable patch detects sleep apnea

A disposable diagnostic patch can detect all types of sleep apnea, according to new clinical trial results. The results showed that the SomnaPatch device had a clinical agreement between the patch and standard polysomnography of 87.4%, with 95% confidence interval of 81.4% to 91.9%, according to its maker Somnarus. SomnaPatch weighs less than 1 ounce

FDA extends UDI compliance date for low risk devices

Labelers of class I and unclassified devices recently got a reprieve when FDA announced an extension of the compliance date for unique device identification (UDI). Makers of devices such as manual surgical instruments and mechanical wheelchairs will have 2 extra years to get these devices submitted to the Global unique device identification database (GUDID), FDA announced last

6 brain-controlled devices helping people regain movement

People who have lost feeling in their limbs or have lost the ability to move them may soon have those sensations restored thanks to a slew of recent brain-controlled device innovations. While we are moving toward less invasive methods such as electrode-filled caps on the head, there are still more invasive implants that are benefiting

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Abbott heart device shown safe for infants

Developing very small devices that can be used for children is a significant challenge in the market. FDA is cautious to approve new devices into this market for vulnerable patients. But the efforts are needed to improve the health of babies, particularly those born with heart defects. Abbott’s reduced sized Amplatzer duct occluder II (ADO