This new device could provide better cervical cancer screening

Histologics has developed a small, Velcro hook-like device that is better able to consistently obtain samples of cells in the cervix during colposcopies to diagnose cervical cancer, according to researchers from the University of California at Riverside. Women who have an abnormal pap smear results usually have to have a colposcopy to closely examine the

Could this at-home monitoring device make the elderly more independent?

A University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign student developed a home monitoring device that allows the elderly to live alone without families worrying about them, according to a case study from Model Solution (Milpitas, Calif.). Jun Young Park, a senior industrial design student led by professor Sung Too Shin, created the INCAIR at-home monitoring device to help

5 innovative medical devices designed by students

The Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) just released its list of the 2017 IDEA award-winning designed products. The winners in the medical device category included several interesting devices. But what really caught our eye was the Student Designs category, which featured several noteworthy medical innovations. These devices were interesting because of their focus on

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How a single drop of blood can detect sepsis

Sepsis can be identified by a single drop of blood, thanks to a lab-on-a-chip device from the University of Illinois. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill., recently completed a clinical study of the device that provides a fast, point-of-care measurement of the body’s immune system response without

How MRI can power mini-robots inside the body for targeted treatment

Scientists at the University of Houston and Houston Methodist Hospital are harnessing the power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to drive mini-robots through the body for targeted treatment. The researchers are developing control algorithms, imaging technology, ultrafast computational methods and human-machine immersion methods that could enable the steering of dozens or even thousands of tiny millimeter-sized

Electronic organs-on-chips non-invasively measure cell health

It’s possible to embed electrodes onto organs-on-chips to noninvasively monitor tissue health and differentiation, according to new research from Harvard University. Researchers are using organs-on-chips more frequently to study human organs and tissues. They offer a better approach to testing drugs because they can mimic blood flow, mechanical microenvironment and how different tissues are able

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 21, 2017

From Second Sight’s South Korean market entry to Sanuwave’s Indonesian distribution deal, here are medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Second Sight enters South Korea market Second Sight announced in a July 5 press release that it has entered the market in South Korea with the implantation of two

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

How Bigfoot Biomedical wants to disrupt diabetes care

Bigfoot Biomedical is a highly competitive player in medtech’s race to develop an artificial pancreas. The 50-person company has made rapid progress towards developing a smart, automated insulin delivery system since its beginnings in 2014. Just yesterday Bigfoot announced that it is partnering with Abbott, bringing together Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre glucose monitoring tech and Bigfoot’s insulin

This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered

How stem cells are creating kidney filtration on a chip

Harvard researchers have developed a glomerulus membrane to mimic the kidney’s filtration system in vitro by using engineered human stem cells. The glomerulus is a structure that has podocyte cells that tightly wrap around capillaries. The cells and the capillaries are separated by a thin membrane of extracellular matrix and between them, a filtration barrier

Medtech stories we missed this week: June 30, 2017

From ConforMIS touting its knee replacement study to Consulting Radiologists’s new breast cancer detection tool, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Study: Low-dose CT scanning improves Ankylosing Spondylitis assessment A new study has shown that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) is more sensitive than X-rays for monitoring

CMS spikes Medicare Advantage data release at the last minute

Medicare Advantage, privately run health plans paid for by Medicare, have covered an increasing number of seniors and disabled people in recent years. More than 1/3 of the 58 million Medicare beneficiaries opt for these non-traditional plans. The government has been collecting data about the care delivered to these enrollees since 2012. Last year, it

Clever catheter lets surgeons see inside arteries to trim plaque

The Pantheris catheter developed by Avinger takes the physician out of the radiation field. A clever catheter design lets cardiologists see inside arteries and precisely remove plaque from diseased tissue. The Pantheris catheter is safer than conventional radiation-guided procedures because it takes the surgeon out of the radiation field, and along with on-board optics, it