8 ways 3D printing is making surgery remarkable

3D printing is already making a difference in healthcare: It enables models of organs to train surgeons and educate patients –and improve surgical outcomes. Doctors previously had to examine actual organs with their hands to get a feel for what they need to do surgically. Now, MRIs and 3D printers eliminate the need to put

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This microscopy technique could create better biopsies

Researchers are using high-resolution image biopsy samples to create more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Light microscopes are usually used for pathology, but fine details of cells can’t be seen with them. The new technique, developed by Harvard Medical School and MIT, relies on expansion microscopy which expands

How Magnolia Medical is battling sepsis false-positives for better value

Seattle-based Magnolia Medical Technologies – which says it makes a dramatic improvement to sepsis testing – provides a great example of the new value arguments dominating medtech. Sepsis happens to be a big deal. Hospital patients are often susceptible to sepsis, a bacterial infection that is the fifth leading cause of death. The standard of care

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 14, 2017

From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief

Researchers develop metal-free contrast agent

Researchers at MIT and the University of Nebraska have developed a contrast agent that is metal-free, which could make it safer for certain individuals, according to a new report. The groups said they have created a metal-free contrast agent which could be safer for high-risk groups, as the fluid uses organic molecules called nitroxides, according

This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Home strep tests save time and money

Parents could save time and money by testing for strep throat at home as opposed to going to the doctor, according to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers also collaborated on the study. Streptococcus, also known as strep throat, causes a sore, red throat that is

MobileODT raises $7m for portable cervical cancer detection device

MobileODT said today that it raised $6.8 million in a Series B financing round. OrbiMed Advisors led the financing and was joined by a previous investor, Tristel. To date, the Israeli cancer diagnostic company has raised more than $13 million. Get the full story at our sister site, MassDevice.

Medtech stories we missed this week: June 30, 2017

From ConforMIS touting its knee replacement study to Consulting Radiologists’s new breast cancer detection tool, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Study: Low-dose CT scanning improves Ankylosing Spondylitis assessment A new study has shown that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) is more sensitive than X-rays for monitoring

Could dogs be better than medical devices at detecting cancer?

Dogs in a small Japanese town are being trained to detect stomach cancer through their scent to try to combat the high rates of stomach cancer in the area, according to media reports. The small 6,000-resident Japanese town of Kaneyama has high rates of stomach cancer and Mayor Hiroshi Suzuki has taken to a sniffer

Neuroimaging could be the key to early autism diagnoses

Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may be able to predict the chances of developing autism by the age of 2 in high-risk 6-month old infants, according to a new study in the Science Translational Medicine journal. Autism is characterized by challenges in social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. People with autism also

SystemOne and BluSense partner to fight Zika

SystemOne has announced that it is partnering with BluSense Diagnostics for its upcoming clinical trials in Brazil and Malaysia – with an eventual goal of combatting the spread of Zika. Both companies have received a USAID Grand Challenge for Development Grant that is going to help the companies combat Zika and other diseases. The partnership

This microhole chip identifies and sorts cancer cells

Fraunhofer researchers have created a microhole chip that can identify and characterize cancer cells within minutes – helping to catch metastasis before it can begin. Traditional fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) gives an estimate of the number of tumor cells in a patient’s bloodstream. If there is a higher concentration of tumor cells, there is a

This wearable patch detects sleep apnea

A disposable diagnostic patch can detect all types of sleep apnea, according to new clinical trial results. The results showed that the SomnaPatch device had a clinical agreement between the patch and standard polysomnography of 87.4%, with 95% confidence interval of 81.4% to 91.9%, according to its maker Somnarus. SomnaPatch weighs less than 1 ounce

Handheld device scans beneath skin for psoriasis evaluation

A new handheld tissue scanner could eliminate the need for contrast agents or radiation exposure when looking under the skin in psoriasis patients, thanks to researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich. The new tissue scanner can give clinicians important information about the skin like the structure of skin layers and