Medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 15, 2017

From Acera Surgical and Telos Medical’s partnership to Xtant Medical’s 510(k) clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. Acera Surgical partners with Telos Medical for Restrata wound matrix trial Telos Partners announced in a Sept. 14 press release that Acera Surgical has chosen Telos to

This smart mat can predict the onset of foot ulcers

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology hackathon participant developed a smart mat that helps detect early warning signs of foot ulcers. Jon Bloom, co-founder of startup company Podimetrics, developed a mat that can detect foot ulcers before they happen and reduce the number of amputations occurring. Bloom completed his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in

Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

New retinal imaging tech promises to help diagnose Alzheimer’s

New technology, developed by NeuroVision Imaging and Cedars-Sinai, is exploring the use of noninvasive eye imaging to detect Alzheimers disease, scanning the retina to identify protein deposits associated with the disorder. The system is designed to look for neurotoxic beta-amyloid protein deposits, which are also found in the brain in Alzheimers patients. Normally, such deposits

Study: Annual mammograms would prevent the most deaths

(Reuters) – Yearly mammograms starting at age 40 would prevent the most deaths from breast cancer, U.S. researchers reported on Monday in a challenge to more conservative recommendations that take into account both the harms and the benefits of screening. The study, led by Dr. Elizabeth Arleo, a radiologist specializing in mammography at Weill Cornell Medicine

Non-invasive cell probing offers new insight into disease progression

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have figured out a way to assess the mechanical properties of a cell using simple observation. Usually, cells have to be probed with expensive instruments like atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers to determine the mechanical properties of a cell. Those methods make direct and invasive contact with the cells. The

How plasma treatments are driving up the value of plastic labware

By altering the surface properties of polymer labware through plasma treatments and coatings, manufacturers are improving the quality of test results while increasing value of products they create. Jeff Elliott, for PVA TePla America Each year, billions of multi-well plates, pipettes, bottles, flasks, vials, Eppendorf tubes, culture plates and other polymer labware items are manufactured for

7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

How a common hospital tool predicts poor outcomes after liver transplants

A frequently used tool in the hospital can be an indicator of which liver transplant recipients will do poorly after surgery, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Led by Vinay Sundaram, a team of researchers found that the nursing assessment called the Braden Scale could be put to use in liver transplant patients

How new chemistry is making medical imaging better

Researchers recently stumbled upon a chemical mechanism that could be used to make radioactive tracers, according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The discovery resulted in an alternative way to create chemical compounds that are beneficial to noninvasive, high-resolution, 3D medical imaging technology like positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

This new device could provide better cervical cancer screening

Histologics has developed a small, Velcro hook-like device that is better able to consistently obtain samples of cells in the cervix during colposcopies to diagnose cervical cancer, according to researchers from the University of California at Riverside. Women who have an abnormal pap smear results usually have to have a colposcopy to closely examine the

How a single drop of blood can detect sepsis

Sepsis can be identified by a single drop of blood, thanks to a lab-on-a-chip device from the University of Illinois. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill., recently completed a clinical study of the device that provides a fast, point-of-care measurement of the body’s immune system response without

Electronic organs-on-chips non-invasively measure cell health

It’s possible to embed electrodes onto organs-on-chips to noninvasively monitor tissue health and differentiation, according to new research from Harvard University. Researchers are using organs-on-chips more frequently to study human organs and tissues. They offer a better approach to testing drugs because they can mimic blood flow, mechanical microenvironment and how different tissues are able

8 ways 3D printing is making surgery remarkable

3D printing is already making a difference in healthcare: It enables models of organs to train surgeons and educate patients –and improve surgical outcomes. Doctors previously had to examine actual organs with their hands to get a feel for what they need to do surgically. Now, MRIs and 3D printers eliminate the need to put

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