Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

How Bigfoot Biomedical wants to disrupt diabetes care

Bigfoot Biomedical is a highly competitive player in medtech’s race to develop an artificial pancreas. The 50-person company has made rapid progress towards developing a smart, automated insulin delivery system since its beginnings in 2014. Just yesterday Bigfoot announced that it is partnering with Abbott, bringing together Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre glucose monitoring tech and Bigfoot’s insulin

Here are the top 5 medtech stories of mid-2017

The middle of 2017 is shaping up to be a continued whirlwind of activity for medtech. FDA is getting used to its new leadership but is facing a continued lack of clarity on user fees and UDIs. Industry is seeing a deeper consolidation in medical supplies, exemplified in Cardinal Health’s purchase of patient recovery supplies from

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Drug delivery devices: Here is West’s plan for success

West Pharmaceutical Services is betting that an embrace of human factors engineering and experiential design will allow its drug delivery devices such as its SmartDose and SelfDose to stand apart from the crowd. People are more likely to take their medications properly if a device is easy to use, Eric Resnick, vice president and chief

MW Industries launches MW Industries Medical Solutions

MW Industries – a maker of springs, specialty fasteners, machined parts and other precision components – today announced the launch of a medtech-focused MW Industries Medical Solutions. MW Industries (Rosemont, Ill.) will be touting its capabilities this week in New York at MD&M East (Booth 721). MW Industries Medical Solutions’s business involves precision metal components

11 companies with interesting technology at MD&M East

Thousands of engineers and executives are expected to descend on the Javits Center in New York next week for MD&M East, the largest medical device manufacturing event on the East Coast. Fun attractions include Apple co-founder Steve “Woz” Wozniak delivering a keynote speech, the 19th annual Medical Design Excellence Awards, robot battles and a 3D printed

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Amaranth Medical looks to recapture the potential of bioresorbable scaffolds

Dr. Antonio Colombo had finished his presentation of 9-month data for Amaranth Medical‘s Aptitude sirolimus-eluting bioresorbable scaffold when an audience member asked about adverse events. He told the EuroPCR attendee that they hadn’t seen any adverse events related to the device during the trial – and that’s unusual. Bioresorbable scaffolds, like Abbott‘s (NYSE:ABT) Absorb, have been

IBM finds new ways to trigger immune system

Researchers at IBM have figured out how to trigger a response from the immune system using polymer-coated graphene sheets. The technique involves attaching drug molecules directly to a nanomaterial like graphene sheets to create nanotherapies that could help treat tumors. Nanotherapies transport drugs directly to tumors for cancer treatment. “We’ve essentially uncovered a new way

Are nanoparticles overhyped?

Young startups backed by nanoparticle tech face a world hurdles before reaching the clinic. It’s been decades since the first innovations with nanotechnology – and experts are asking, “Where are all the drugs?” It’s been more than 20 years since the FDA approved the first nanoparticle drug, Doxil. At the time, nanoparticles were heralded as a

Vetter, Microdermics ink deal to develop novel microneedle drug delivery system

Prefilled drug delivery system developer Vetter and medical device maker Microdermics said yesterday that the companies are working to develop a novel microneedle drug delivery system. Microdermics has developed a low-cost, commercially scalable, customizable microneedle platform that delivers vaccines and biologics. The company said it expects its intradermal delivery system will enter Phase I clinical trials this

9 diabetes breakthroughs you need to know

Diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to produce and respond to insulin. About 29.1 million people have diabetes in the U.S, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of that number, 8.1 million go undiagnosed. One of the most popular breakthroughs in diabetes research has been the artificial pancreas, which

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Artificial pancreas: These companies are racing to make one

Medical device companies are close to achieving the holy grail of diabetes treatment: a combined glucose sensor, control algorithm and insulin infusion device that effectively acts as an “artificial pancreas.” We explain more in our newest Medical Design & Outsourcing video. (And for a deeper dive, check out our recent roundup of companies in the

Raumedic touts customized silicone syringe plungers

Raumedic has released customized syringe plungers made of silicone that come in a wide range of designs. Syringe plungers made of silicone allow for precise dosing of the drug being administered. Other advantages of this material include its physical/mechanical properties and the high chemical purity of its formulation. Last but not least, silicone allows for

FDA approves first ALS treatment in over 2 decades

The FDA recently announced that it has approved the drug Radicava (edaravone) to help treat patients who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, according to the ALS Association. Motor neurons in the brain

Wireless power source could enable ingestible drug delivery devices

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory have developed the means to wirelessly power electronic devices that stay in the digestive tract indefinitely. The team suggests that these devices could be used as sensors in the GI tract or carry drugs to be delivered over