Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

This nerve-blocking treatment could treat asthma and heart failure

Electrical nerve-blocking implants could help treat asthma and heart failure, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University. Niloy Bhadra and Kevin Kilgore, professors of biomedical engineering and orthopedic surgery respectively, have been working on the nerve-blocking research since 2000. The research blocks unwanted generation of nerve impulses in a variety of clinical applications.

Enabling micro-sensors for next-gen interactive implants

CerMet – an advanced ceramic and metal technology system – creates the potential for implantable devices with thousands of electrical channels. Think new options for treating blindness and neurological conditions. Only a few years old, Heraeus’ CerMet is upping the game when it comes to sophisticated implantable electronic devices. “Medical implants manufactured using the Heraeus CerMet

Navigating the FDA for connected devices

As connectivity features become increasingly prevalent, developers are tasked with accounting for regulatory implications in increasingly long-term plans. Aidan Petrie, Ximedica Let’s imagine a product that dispenses a drug for eczema. At its most basic, the dispenser is little more than a package for the primary drug container and so falls under some medical packaging

How advanced lithium batteries enable medical devices to be miniaturized

Sol Jacobs, Vice President & General Manager, Tadiran Batteries Lithium batteries are allowing medical devices to become smaller and more ergonomic without sacrificing power or performance. Modern medical devices are become increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized, demanding more for advanced battery-powered solutions. Lithium batteries are paving the way by powering a wide variety of medical devices,

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

Traumatic brain injury: Transcranial e-stim may help

Researchers from the University of California San Diego and from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System have improved neural function in a group of people with mild traumatic brain injury using low-impulse electrical stimulation to the brain, according to a study published in Brain Injury. Although little is understood about the pathology of mild TBI, the team

Hoffmann + Krippner and OKW Gehäuse partner for touch screens

Hoffmann + Krippner announced that it has partnered with German manufacturer OKW Gehäuse to develop touchscreen solutions. OKW creates plastic and aluminum enclosures and turning knobs using different manufacturing and finishing techniques like mechanical processing, vanish, print and EMC coating. By collaborating with OKW, Hoffman + Krippner can being to offer modular touch systems. The

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

How electrical currents could monitor lung functions from an ICU bed

Electrical currents from an electrode-filled belt could soon help monitor important bodily functions like lung function, according to Austrian researchers. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a new imaging technique created by a collaboration between Technische Universität Wien, Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna. The electrode-filled belt is applied directly on

Schurter announces solid state SMD fuse for demanding applications

Schurter recently announced its new High Current Fuse (HCF), which it is touting as a robust SMD fuse. The High Current fuse uses solid-state, thin-film technology.  It has fast-reacting breaking capacity rated 1000 A at 125 VAC/ 125 VDC, over a current range of 5 A to 15A. Schurter (Santa Rosa, Calif.) says the HCF

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could