This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

How electrical currents could monitor lung functions from an ICU bed

Electrical currents from an electrode-filled belt could soon help monitor important bodily functions like lung function, according to Austrian researchers. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a new imaging technique created by a collaboration between Technische Universität Wien, Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna. The electrode-filled belt is applied directly on

Schurter announces solid state SMD fuse for demanding applications

Schurter recently announced its new High Current Fuse (HCF), which it is touting as a robust SMD fuse. The High Current fuse uses solid-state, thin-film technology.  It has fast-reacting breaking capacity rated 1000 A at 125 VAC/ 125 VDC, over a current range of 5 A to 15A. Schurter (Santa Rosa, Calif.) says the HCF

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

Electrical fields can heal brain damage: Here’s how

Electrical fields can guide neural stem cells into a specific location to repair brain damage, according to new research from the University of California at Davis. Min Zhao, a researcher at UC Davis, studies how electric fields can guide wound healing. His previous research has shown that electric fields are able to attract cells into

7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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Wisconsin biotech industry optimistic about state’s Foxconn win

Wisconsin’s biotech industry sees opportunity in Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn’s decision to spend $10 billion on a 3,000-employee plant in the state’s southeast. That’s because the 8K liquid crystal display (LCD) screens made at the new Foxconn campus could enable new medical solutions for surgical procedures, according to BioForward Wisconsin. “BioForward and Wisconsin’s biohealth community welcomes

Could this temperature sensor reduce power consumption in medical devices?

A new temperature sensor that runs at 113 pW could make wearables and even implantable medical devices less power dependent, according to research from the University of California at San Diego. The temperature sensor, developed by electrical engineers at UCSD, uses about 628 times lower power than state-of-the-art power sources and is 10 billion times

Electronic organs-on-chips non-invasively measure cell health

It’s possible to embed electrodes onto organs-on-chips to noninvasively monitor tissue health and differentiation, according to new research from Harvard University. Researchers are using organs-on-chips more frequently to study human organs and tissues. They offer a better approach to testing drugs because they can mimic blood flow, mechanical microenvironment and how different tissues are able

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

New Multi-Tier Locking C13 IEC Power Outlet

MEGA Electronics announced the launch of its latest product, the space-saving C-13 multi-tier outlets. Made from nylon LSZH, these outlets feature a locking mechanism designed to maintain uptime and protect against accidental disconnections. This outlet is an ideal solution for data centers. Each outlet comes with an independent-release locking mechanism and an easy-to-access button to

Minnetronix completes facility expansion

Minnetronix today announced the completion of a 22,000-square-foot expansion of its home in St. Paul, Minn. The investment – which brings combined space of the St. Paul facility to 125,000 square feet – will increase the medical device contract manufacturer’s production capacity by 50%. Minnetronix has nearly doubled its employee headcount over the past two