Value-based care: CMS’s new administrator wants more of it

Seven months into her tenure, CMS administrator Seema Verma is turning out to be highly supportive of value-based care models. In fact, she recently told an audience in Cleveland that she wants them implemented faster. The situation appears to dispel doubts that alternative payment models – such as Accountable Care Organizations or “comprehensive care” models for

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 20, 2017

From InspireMD’s distribution deal to RenalGuard touting a new study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD inks Chile distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Oct. 12 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with CorpMedical Chile to distribute the MGuard Prime

The 11 most innovative medical devices of 2017

The nominees for the best medical technology of 2017 were recently announced for the 11th Annual Prix Galien USA Awards. The Galien Foundation, the host of the awards, hands out the the Prix Galien Award annually to examples of outstanding biomedical and technology product achievement designed to improve human condition. Before candidates can qualify for

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Less than half of healthcare professionals think medtech brands meet needs

Roughly two-fifths of healthcare professionals say medical device brands aren’t meeting expectations, and failure to offer flexible contract options is also a problem, according to a new survey from Vennli (South Bend, Ind.). The survey, called “Differentiating to Win in Medical Device Marketing,” polled over 9,000 physicians, dentists and other clinicians to figure out what

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 6, 2017

From Intellijoint’s CE Mark to Patrona Medical and Kopis’ new partnership, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Intellijoint CE Mark for flagship hip navigation Intellijoint surgical announced in an Oct. 4 press release that it has received CE Mark for its Intellijoint HIP System in

Mini lab-made kidneys help track polycystic kidney disease

University of Washington researchers created mini kidneys out of stem cells to help track the early stages of polycystic kidney disease. Researchers created and grew mini-kidney organoids that have a realistic micro anatomy to study polycystic kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disease that causes cysts to grow in the kidneys. The cysts

Could their be a bipartisan Obamacare fix?

Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act appear to be dead – at least for now. But two U.S. senators may soon unveil a bipartisan proposal to make modest healthcare fixes. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the committee’s ranking […]

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

4 ways wearables will transform healthcare’s future

Wearable technology is moving beyond consumer-grade health and wellness devices – the daily step counters and heart rate trackers offered by the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. “They’re convenient, small, portable and inexpensive, but you don’t use consumer items for life and death,” said Dr. Arthur Combs, chief medical officer at flexible electronics company MC10

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7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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How a common hospital tool predicts poor outcomes after liver transplants

A frequently used tool in the hospital can be an indicator of which liver transplant recipients will do poorly after surgery, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Led by Vinay Sundaram, a team of researchers found that the nursing assessment called the Braden Scale could be put to use in liver transplant patients

Could this algorithm be better at diagnosing arrhythmia than cardiologists?

A new algorithm that can go through hours of heart data to detect arrhythmia performs better than trained cardiologists, according to new research from Stanford University. The algorithm gathers data from wearable monitors to find life-threatening irregular heartbeats and allows for data to be sorted through in remote areas where there is a scarcity of

How a single drop of blood can detect sepsis

Sepsis can be identified by a single drop of blood, thanks to a lab-on-a-chip device from the University of Illinois. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill., recently completed a clinical study of the device that provides a fast, point-of-care measurement of the body’s immune system response without

This wearable device predicts influenza outbreaks

A wearable thermometer developed by Boston Children’s Hospital has had success in predicting seasonal influenza outbreaks in China, one month earlier than before, according to a new study. “The fact that we were able to predict influenza outbreaks faster than China’s national surveillance programs really shows the capacity for everyday, wearable digital health devices to

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered