PeekMed receives CE Mark and ISO certification

PeekMed (Braga, Portugal) recently announced that it has received ISO 13485 certification and CE Mark for its flagship 3D pre-operative system for orthopedic surgeons. The new CE Mark allows PeekMed to sell its system in Europe. It is currently working on obtaining FDA 510(k) approval to market in the U.S. PeekMed helps orthopedic surgeons plan

How augmented reality could guide facial reconstruction surgeries

A Japanese research team has created an augmented reality (AR) system that allows them to create 3D simulations of facial reconstructive procedure results, projecting the images over a patient’s face during surgery. Researchers at Osaka Medical College in Japan reported that they have developed and tested the AR system for evaluating improvements of the body

New retinal imaging tech promises to help diagnose Alzheimer’s

New technology, developed by NeuroVision Imaging and Cedars-Sinai, is exploring the use of noninvasive eye imaging to detect Alzheimers disease, scanning the retina to identify protein deposits associated with the disorder. The system is designed to look for neurotoxic beta-amyloid protein deposits, which are also found in the brain in Alzheimers patients. Normally, such deposits

Fujifilm announces U.S. customer wins for Synapse imaging system

Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. said today that seven U.S. healthcare systems are picking up various products from the company’s Synapse enterprise imaging portfolio. The health systems includeHackensack Meridian Health and West Virginia University Health System – two of the largest healthcare networks in the mid-Atlantic region. Products bought include the Synapse 5 PACS, Synapse VNA, Synapse

Study: Annual mammograms would prevent the most deaths

(Reuters) – Yearly mammograms starting at age 40 would prevent the most deaths from breast cancer, U.S. researchers reported on Monday in a challenge to more conservative recommendations that take into account both the harms and the benefits of screening. The study, led by Dr. Elizabeth Arleo, a radiologist specializing in mammography at Weill Cornell Medicine

Non-invasive cell probing offers new insight into disease progression

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have figured out a way to assess the mechanical properties of a cell using simple observation. Usually, cells have to be probed with expensive instruments like atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers to determine the mechanical properties of a cell. Those methods make direct and invasive contact with the cells. The

Abbott’s new contact ablation catheter: Here’s what you need to know

The new TactiCath contact ablation catheter unites EndoSense and St. Jude Medical technologies that Abbott acquired, marrying fiber optics, flexibility and 3D mapping. If you want your grilled cheese to cook faster, you press it into the pan with your spatula. That’s contact force, the principle behind Abbott’s TactiCath contact force ablation catheter, according to

How new chemistry is making medical imaging better

Researchers recently stumbled upon a chemical mechanism that could be used to make radioactive tracers, according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The discovery resulted in an alternative way to create chemical compounds that are beneficial to noninvasive, high-resolution, 3D medical imaging technology like positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

Medtech stories we missed this week: August 4, 2017

From MDCorp inking a European distribution deal to Align Technology’s North Carolina expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. MDCorp inks distribution deal with Smart Endoscope Systems MDCorp announced in a July 31 press release that it has signed a distribution agreement with Smart Endoscope

8 ways 3D printing is making surgery remarkable

3D printing is already making a difference in healthcare: It enables models of organs to train surgeons and educate patients –and improve surgical outcomes. Doctors previously had to examine actual organs with their hands to get a feel for what they need to do surgically. Now, MRIs and 3D printers eliminate the need to put

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Zeiss touts new imaging software

The new Zeiss Zen 2 core imaging software is a lab infrastructure booster that connects systems, data and workflows, according to its creator Zeiss. The software reflects multi-modal workflows in connected lab environments with a single general user interface, according to Zeiss. The company says the result is a boost in efficiency through interactive control of

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 14, 2017

From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief

Biocompatible 3D tracking could improve surgeries

Johns Hopkins University researchers recently wowed with their smart tissue, autonomous robot (STAR). It turns out the STAR’s biocompatible, near-infrared 3D tracking system is innovative, too. The tracking system – which uses near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) markers – could improve both manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions, according to a new study. The study compared the 3D tracking

Agilent Tech pays $52m for Raman spectroscopy developer Cobalt

Agilent Technologies said today it’s acquired U.K.-based Raman spectroscopic instrument developer Cobalt Light Systems for $51.5 million (GBP £40 million). Cobalt develops benchtop and handheld Raman spectroscopic instruments based on proprietary technologies to enable through-barrier identification of chemicals and materials, the company said. “Raman spectroscopy is one of the fastest-growing segments in spectroscopy. This acquisition

Neuroimaging could be the key to early autism diagnoses

Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may be able to predict the chances of developing autism by the age of 2 in high-risk 6-month old infants, according to a new study in the Science Translational Medicine journal. Autism is characterized by challenges in social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. People with autism also