Biocompatible 3D tracking could improve surgeries

Johns Hopkins University researchers recently wowed with their smart tissue, autonomous robot (STAR). It turns out the STAR’s biocompatible, near-infrared 3D tracking system is innovative, too. The tracking system – which uses near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) markers – could improve both manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions, according to a new study. The study compared the 3D tracking

Agilent Tech pays $52m for Raman spectroscopy developer Cobalt

Agilent Technologies said today it’s acquired U.K.-based Raman spectroscopic instrument developer Cobalt Light Systems for $51.5 million (GBP £40 million). Cobalt develops benchtop and handheld Raman spectroscopic instruments based on proprietary technologies to enable through-barrier identification of chemicals and materials, the company said. “Raman spectroscopy is one of the fastest-growing segments in spectroscopy. This acquisition

Neuroimaging could be the key to early autism diagnoses

Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may be able to predict the chances of developing autism by the age of 2 in high-risk 6-month old infants, according to a new study in the Science Translational Medicine journal. Autism is characterized by challenges in social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. People with autism also

Fujifilm receives authority to operate on government networks

Fujifilm Medical Systems has announced that its Synapse PACS medical imaging and information management system has officially received Authority to Operate (ATO) on Department of Defense (DoD) networks in the U.S. The ATO makes Fujifilm the first company with a networked medical system to gain Risk Management Framework-based ATO. “This particular ATO is an unprecedented

Handheld device scans beneath skin for psoriasis evaluation

A new handheld tissue scanner could eliminate the need for contrast agents or radiation exposure when looking under the skin in psoriasis patients, thanks to researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich. The new tissue scanner can give clinicians important information about the skin like the structure of skin layers and

DoubleBlack Imaging buys Richardson Healthcare’s PACS imaging display biz

Richardson Electronics said last week it is selling its picture archiving and communications systems display business, including its Image Systems brand, to Double Black Imaging for an undisclosed amount. The Image Systems portfolio includes 2MP through 6MP color and grayscale displays as well as proprietary CFS calibration software designed to simplify conformance and calibration of

Why X-rays in shoe stores were a really bad idea

Vanessa Burrows, FDA historian X-rays have enhanced healthcare in a variety of ways since their discovery in the late 19th century. But like many cutting-edge scientific developments, the technology has also inspired uses of uncertain therapeutic value. That was the case with the shoe-fitting fluoroscope, the subject of the latest episode of FDA’s history video

Endra Life Sciences IPO to raise $8.4 million

Endra Life Sciences’s IPO offering, which closes tomorrow, is expected to raise $8.4 million as the company seeks to commercialize its Thermo Acoustic Enhanced Ultrasound (TAEUS) in Europe. Endra announced May 9 that the IPO would involve 1.68 million units – each including one share of common stock and a warrant to purchase an additional share of

B. Braun Medical to bring Christie Medical’s VeinViewer to more hospitals

Christie Medical Holdings, with its vein-finding VeinViewer system, has announced a strategic alliance with B. Braun Medical, a major player in infusion therapy and pain management. “Aligning the VeinViewer technology with one of the top companies in the United States’s peripheral IV catheter market provides our customers with a seamless solution for improving peripheral IV access,” said

This test can detect tiny ovarian tumors sooner than current tests

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have developed a way to detect ovarian tumors that are smaller than 2 mm in diameter, allowing for detection 5 months earlier than existing tests. A synthetic biomarker, which is a nanoparticle that works with tumor proteins to release fragments into the urine for detection, helps the MIT-developed test create

Philips’ digitized biopsied tissue slides wins FDA authorization

Philips recently received FDA permission to market its Philips IntelliSite Pathology Solution (PIPS) – touted as the first whole slide imaging system over which pathologists can review digital versions slides prepared from biopsied tissue. The FDA permission, which the agency announced April 12, marks the first time the agency has allowed the marketing of a

How deep learning could change diagnostic imaging forever

Computational imaging is a passion for Fabein Beckers. As the CEO of Arterys, Beckers thinks he can revolutionize how doctors on a global scale work with imaging diagnostics. In that vein, Beckers and his team launched Arterys, which enables clinical visualization and accurate quantification of blood flow inside the body. It measures 7 dimensions of data (3 in

Philips sees image-guided therapy transforming healthcare: Here’s how

Officials at medtech giant Royal Philips see image-guided therapy as key when it comes to health practitioners providing care that is both efficient and effective. The Dutch multinational’s work in the field provides a great example of how the ever-growing need for cost-effective healthcare around the world is driving the strategies of medical device companies.

New fluorescent probe could light up cancer

What if you could plaster cancer cells with glowing “Here We Are” signs, so surgeons could be confident that they’d removed every last speck of a tumor? That’s what Haiying Liu has in mind for his new fluorescent probe. “Doctors need to pinpoint cancer tissue, but that can be hard,” said Liu, a chemistry professor

This LED-based device predicts radiation skin damage

Researchers at UC Irvine’s Beckman Laser Institute are developing imaging to predict the skin damage that breast cancer patients will experience from radiation treatment, The Optical Society reported today. “We use visible and near-infrared light at very low power and project it onto the breast. We are trying to characterize the skin damage during radiation