First patient treated with Biostage’s esophageal implant

Biostage (NSDQ:BSTG) touted today the first patient use of its Cellspan esophageal implant. The Holliston, Mass.-based company said that the regenerative implant was used in a 75-year old male patient, who has a life-threatening cancerous mass in his chest. Surgeons removed the portion of his esophagus affected by the cancer and Biostage’s implant was used to

7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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Medtech stories we missed this week: July 28, 2017

From Accenture’s AI-powered app to help the visually impaired to Rayovac getting clearance from Health Canada, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but still thought were worth mentioning. 1. Accenture touts AI-powered app for visually impaired Accenture announced in a July 28 press release that it has developed an artificial intelligence–powered way to

Patients don’t have to lose weight for joint replacement surgeries

Obese patients who are having knee or hip replacement surgery don’t need to lose weight prior to surgery to reap the benefits, according to a new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “Our data shows it’s not necessary to ask patients to lose weight prior to surgery,” said Wenjun Li, lead author on

Could this temperature sensor reduce power consumption in medical devices?

A new temperature sensor that runs at 113 pW could make wearables and even implantable medical devices less power dependent, according to research from the University of California at San Diego. The temperature sensor, developed by electrical engineers at UCSD, uses about 628 times lower power than state-of-the-art power sources and is 10 billion times

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

Lamborghini is helping to create better prosthetics

Automobili Lamborghini is collaborating with Houston Methodist Research Institute to bring its carbon fiber composite material expertise to prosthetic implants. The research that Lamborghini will be joining is a biocompatibility study of the composite materials that are used in prosthetic implants and subcutaneous devices. The goal of the study is to be able to determine

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 7, 2017

From EnvisionTEC’s FDA approval to InVivo Therapeutics adding a new clinical site, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. EnvisionTEC wins FDA nod for 3D printing E-Denture material EnvisionTEC announced in a June 30 press release that it has received FDA approval for its E-Denture material

How to treat involuntary eye movement with magnets

Magnets implanted behind the eye of a patient have been used to treat involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus, according to new research from the University College London (UCL) and the University of Oxford. The research team implanted a set of magnets in the eye socket beneath each eye in a patient who has nystagmus.

Engineered tissue could eliminate radiation for bone marrow transplants

University of California San Diego engineers have created artificial bone tissue that could eliminate the need for radiation before bone marrow transplants. Shyni Varghese, a bioengineering professor at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led a team to develop a bone-like implant to eliminate the pre-treatment radiation that kills stem cells in a patient’s bone

Cleveland Clinic, Boston Sci think deep brain stimulation can treat strokes

The Cleveland Clinic is pioneering deep brain stimulation for stroke recovery, with an ongoing clinical trial to determine if Boston Scientific’s Vercise DBS system improves movement in recovering stroke patients. Dr. Andre Machado and his team performed the 6-hour deep brain stimulation surgery on Dec. 19, 2016. The procedure implanted electrodes into the cerebellum section

6 ways hydrogels are enabling medtech innovation

Hydrogels are water-based biomaterials developed specifically for human use, according to a Biomaterials journal article. They are a water-swollen polymeric material that doesn’t change its distinct 3D structure. They are formed from super-absorbent, chain-like polymers and are not soluble in water. However, their porous surface allows for nutrients and cell waste to pass through. They have

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Rubbery, implantable fibers used to study the spinal cord

New rubber-like fibers can match the flexibility of the spine as they deliver optical impulses to study spinal cord neurons, thanks to researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Scientists use implantable fibers to study the brain, giving them the opportunity to stimulate specific parts of the brain to monitor electrical responses. Before the rubber fibers,

Medtech stories we missed this week: April 14, 2017

From FDA approvals to business expansion plans, here are medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. BioTelemetry launches offer to acquire LifeWatch BioTelemetry and LifeWatch announced in an April 9 press release that the 2 companies have entered a transaction agreement that states BioTelemetry will launch a tender offer to acquire all

Biostage touts preclinical data for Cellspan regenerative implant

Biostage (NSDQ:BSTG) touted preclinical data for its Cellspan esophageal implant at this year’s annual meeting of the Society for Biomaterials. The 27-person biotech based in Holliston, Mass., is developing technology to regrow esophageal tissue in patients that have esophageal cancer or atresia. Biostage has devised a way to combine stem cell therapy and a biocompatible device