8 ways 3D printing is making surgery remarkable

3D printing is already making a difference in healthcare: It enables models of organs to train surgeons and educate patients –and improve surgical outcomes. Doctors previously had to examine actual organs with their hands to get a feel for what they need to do surgically. Now, MRIs and 3D printers eliminate the need to put

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This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered

3D printed patch grows blood vessels

A newly developed 3D printed patch helps grow healthy blood vessels, according to a new study from Boston University. Professor Christopher Chen, director of the biological Design Center at Boston University, is in the process of developing 3D printed patches that are infused with cells to grow healthy blood vessels to treat ischemia. Ischemia is

New non-invasive brain stimulation method could treat autism and more

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have figured out how to non-invasively deliver electrical stimulation to specific parts of the brain. In collaboration with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the IT’IS Foundation, the MIT researchers have placed electrodes on the scalps of patients to stimulate regions that are deep in the brain, making a

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

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Could dogs be better than medical devices at detecting cancer?

Dogs in a small Japanese town are being trained to detect stomach cancer through their scent to try to combat the high rates of stomach cancer in the area, according to media reports. The small 6,000-resident Japanese town of Kaneyama has high rates of stomach cancer and Mayor Hiroshi Suzuki has taken to a sniffer

Macular degeneration recreated on a chip

Tohoku University researchers say they’ve recreated retinal diseases such as macular degeneration on a chip for disease modeling and drug screening. A research team from the Graduate Schools of Engineering and Medicine at Tohoku University cultured human retinal cells and vascular endothelial cells to replicate the outermost structure of the retina. Retinal cells exposed to

Cardiology research breakthroughs you need to know

Recent months have seen a host of important cardiology research breakthroughs related to new cardio devices and diagnostics, tissue engineering and the overall understanding of heart disease and its treatment. For example,  a customizable robotic heart sleeve – developed at Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital – has demonstrated advantages over other heart assist devices

This microhole chip identifies and sorts cancer cells

Fraunhofer researchers have created a microhole chip that can identify and characterize cancer cells within minutes – helping to catch metastasis before it can begin. Traditional fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) gives an estimate of the number of tumor cells in a patient’s bloodstream. If there is a higher concentration of tumor cells, there is a

Handheld device scans beneath skin for psoriasis evaluation

A new handheld tissue scanner could eliminate the need for contrast agents or radiation exposure when looking under the skin in psoriasis patients, thanks to researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich. The new tissue scanner can give clinicians important information about the skin like the structure of skin layers and

RxFunction device helps diabetics walk again

Patients who have peripheral neuropathy as a result of diabetes have shown improvement in their gait and balance using RxFunction’s new wearable sensory prosthesis, according to a new study. A research study from Wingate University has tested the long-term benefits of using wearable technology company RxFunction’s Walkasins in people who have peripheral neuropathy. “These exciting

2 paths to success on the medtech fundraising trail

Funding a medical technology company isn’t a simple job: Modern medical devices require cutting-edge innovation, research and design to make it to market. And don’t even get started on regulatory and reimbursement challenges. The recession of the late 2000s, Affordable Care Act and changes to regulatory bodies and reimbursement requirements have changed the game for

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This could be the battery-free solution for pacemakers

A new energy storage system charges itself using ions from inside the human body – providing an exciting alternative to traditional batteries used in pacemakers, according to researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Connecticut. Researchers at the universities developed a bio-friendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor;

‘No-touch’ heart bypass surgery reduces strokes

A recent study from the University of Sydney and Sydney Heart and Lung Surgeons has shown that a new “no-touch” beating heart bypass surgery technique has reduced post-operative stroke by 78%. The procedure, known as an OPCABG, also reduced post-operative mortality by 50% compared to traditional coronary artery bypass grafting. It reduced renal failure by