This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

How WiFi could monitor sleep disorders

Monitoring sleep disorders could be as easy as measuring the radio waves around a patient through WiFi, according to new research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital. Traditionally, physicians measure sleep disorders through electrodes or other sensors attached to a patient. The new method, however, is a device that uses an advanced

This new nanochip technology can reprogram human cells

Ohio State University researchers have developed a nanochip technology that they say can create any cell type for treatment within the human body. The new technology, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), can repair injured tissue and restore the function of aging tissue like organs, blood vessels and nerve cells. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured

Electrical fields can heal brain damage: Here’s how

Electrical fields can guide neural stem cells into a specific location to repair brain damage, according to new research from the University of California at Davis. Min Zhao, a researcher at UC Davis, studies how electric fields can guide wound healing. His previous research has shown that electric fields are able to attract cells into

3D printing is possible in water: why you should care

Can you 3D print in water? According to researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, you can. The Israeli researchers have developed a photoinitiator for 3D printing in water. 3D printing structures in water has always been challenging due to a lack of water soluble molecules known as photoinitiators —

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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5 innovative medical devices designed by students

The Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) just released its list of the 2017 IDEA award-winning designed products. The winners in the medical device category included several interesting devices. But what really caught our eye was the Student Designs category, which featured several noteworthy medical innovations. These devices were interesting because of their focus on

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How MRI can power mini-robots inside the body for targeted treatment

Scientists at the University of Houston and Houston Methodist Hospital are harnessing the power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to drive mini-robots through the body for targeted treatment. The researchers are developing control algorithms, imaging technology, ultrafast computational methods and human-machine immersion methods that could enable the steering of dozens or even thousands of tiny millimeter-sized

Electronic organs-on-chips non-invasively measure cell health

It’s possible to embed electrodes onto organs-on-chips to noninvasively monitor tissue health and differentiation, according to new research from Harvard University. Researchers are using organs-on-chips more frequently to study human organs and tissues. They offer a better approach to testing drugs because they can mimic blood flow, mechanical microenvironment and how different tissues are able

8 ways 3D printing is making surgery remarkable

3D printing is already making a difference in healthcare: It enables models of organs to train surgeons and educate patients –and improve surgical outcomes. Doctors previously had to examine actual organs with their hands to get a feel for what they need to do surgically. Now, MRIs and 3D printers eliminate the need to put

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This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered

3D printed patch grows blood vessels

A newly developed 3D printed patch helps grow healthy blood vessels, according to a new study from Boston University. Professor Christopher Chen, director of the biological Design Center at Boston University, is in the process of developing 3D printed patches that are infused with cells to grow healthy blood vessels to treat ischemia. Ischemia is