Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 27, 2017

From RadiaDyne’s FDA expansion to NuVasive launching its new implants, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA expands indications for RadiaDyne’s OARtrac dose monitor RadiaDyne announced in an Oct. 24 press release that it has received additional FDA clearance for its upcoming OARtrac. The OARtrac allows

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 20, 2017

From InspireMD’s distribution deal to RenalGuard touting a new study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD inks Chile distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Oct. 12 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with CorpMedical Chile to distribute the MGuard Prime

The 11 most innovative medical devices of 2017

The nominees for the best medical technology of 2017 were recently announced for the 11th Annual Prix Galien USA Awards. The Galien Foundation, the host of the awards, hands out the the Prix Galien Award annually to examples of outstanding biomedical and technology product achievement designed to improve human condition. Before candidates can qualify for

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Spinal cord stimulator could curb opioid prescriptions: Here’s how

The first implantation of Nuvectra’s Algovita Spinal Cord Stimulation System was recently performed in Northern California. The FDA-approved Algovita SCS System was able to successfully treat a injured veteran’s chronic pain to reduce the use of opioids to battle the pain. “Following injuries sustained in the line of duty, this particular patient had multiple surgeries

Blood metal ion levels help determine low-risk ARMD patients

A new study suggests that blood metal ion levels can determine patients who have a low risk of having adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). Patients who receive metal-on-metal artificial hips tend to be at risk of having complications due to ARMD. However, researchers discovered that blood metal ion levels that are specific to the

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

This 3D printed implant replaces skull bone

A New Jersey doctor turned to Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Synthes and a 3D printed implant to replace missing skull bone in a patient. The procedure was performed after the patient suffered brain swelling and the skull became infected. Dr. Gaurav Gupta, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, had to

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

How to treat involuntary eye movement with magnets

Magnets implanted behind the eye of a patient have been used to treat involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus, according to new research from the University College London (UCL) and the University of Oxford. The research team implanted a set of magnets in the eye socket beneath each eye in a patient who has nystagmus.

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

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