Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

This 3D printed implant replaces skull bone

A New Jersey doctor turned to Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Synthes and a 3D printed implant to replace missing skull bone in a patient. The procedure was performed after the patient suffered brain swelling and the skull became infected. Dr. Gaurav Gupta, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, had to

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

How to treat involuntary eye movement with magnets

Magnets implanted behind the eye of a patient have been used to treat involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus, according to new research from the University College London (UCL) and the University of Oxford. The research team implanted a set of magnets in the eye socket beneath each eye in a patient who has nystagmus.

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

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Medtech stories we missed this week: June 30, 2017

From ConforMIS touting its knee replacement study to Consulting Radiologists’s new breast cancer detection tool, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Study: Low-dose CT scanning improves Ankylosing Spondylitis assessment A new study has shown that low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) is more sensitive than X-rays for monitoring

This could be the battery-free solution for pacemakers

A new energy storage system charges itself using ions from inside the human body – providing an exciting alternative to traditional batteries used in pacemakers, according to researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Connecticut. Researchers at the universities developed a bio-friendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor;

3D printing is stransforming maxillofacial surgeries: Here’s how

Customized, 3D models for pre-surgical preparations are transforming maxillofacial surgical procedures in the U.K. – thanks to Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing. Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, U.K. is using Stratasys’ Objet Eden350V 3D Printer and has reported having an up to 93% reduction in surgical planning time that comes with standard anatomical models. They have

Engineered tissue could eliminate radiation for bone marrow transplants

University of California San Diego engineers have created artificial bone tissue that could eliminate the need for radiation before bone marrow transplants. Shyni Varghese, a bioengineering professor at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led a team to develop a bone-like implant to eliminate the pre-treatment radiation that kills stem cells in a patient’s bone

Critic questions FDA’s handling of Essure product complaints

FDA continues to update how it is informing the public about the controversial Essure permanent birth control device from Bayer. But at least one prominent critic sees holes in FDA’s efforts. “Many women are still being implanted with the device without adequate warnings of the risks associated with the device,” attorney Holly Ennis wrote in an

Rubbery, implantable fibers used to study the spinal cord

New rubber-like fibers can match the flexibility of the spine as they deliver optical impulses to study spinal cord neurons, thanks to researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Scientists use implantable fibers to study the brain, giving them the opportunity to stimulate specific parts of the brain to monitor electrical responses. Before the rubber fibers,