Who could replace Zimmer Biomet’s CEO?

Zimmer Biomet surprised this week with the announcement that CEO David Dvorak is immediately stepping down. So who will replace him? For now, the orthopedic device giant’s SVP and CFO Dan Florin will serve as interim CEO while the company’s board searches for a new permanent CEO. It is unclear whether Florin – who was VP and

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Stryker launches new deformity correction hardware

Stryker’s Foot and Ankle business unit announced that it is launching its Hoffman LRF Hexapod hardware and online application for deformity correction. The Hoffmann LFR Hexapod uses mathematical algorithms to calculate solutions to correct deformities. “Stryker’s Hoffman LRF Hexapod and its innovative software is a step forward for surgeons and patients involved with complex deformity

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

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North American artificial disc replacement market to reach $614.5 million

The North American artificial disc replacement (ADR) market – which covers Canada, Mexico and the U.S. – is set to more than double from $274.6 million in 2016 to around $614.5 million by 2023, representing a compound annual growth rate of 12.2%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. The company’s latest report states that key

Engineered tissue could eliminate radiation for bone marrow transplants

University of California San Diego engineers have created artificial bone tissue that could eliminate the need for radiation before bone marrow transplants. Shyni Varghese, a bioengineering professor at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led a team to develop a bone-like implant to eliminate the pre-treatment radiation that kills stem cells in a patient’s bone

Micron Solutions boosts revenues, narrows losses in Q1

Precision medical device components maker Micron Solutions reported improvements with its finances during the first three months of 2017–even as it faced challenges related to validation requirements. “We have made several improvements in quality systems, capacity and our ability to meet customer requirements. We believe we have laid a solid foundation for further improvement and

Surgeon entrepreneur bets on virtual reality to boost surgical training

Dr. Justin Barad is a gamer, so it makes sense he would be drawn to virtual reality. As a high schooler, Barad started the computer science team. He interned at Activision, and was all set to be a game developer. But then Barad started to think about how he could help people. He ended up

Meet the computer-automated drill that cuts surgery time down to minutes

What do machining auto parts and speeding up cranial surgery have in common? Think a computer-driven drill that can produce fast, safe, clean cuts in complex surgical procedures. Such computer-automated drills, which have long been used in automotive technology, have the potential to speed surgeries by 50% or more. Researchers from the University of Utah

MicroPort Orthopedics launches new tibial system

MicroPort Orthopedics – a medical device company that develops and manufactures joint replacement implants designed to help patients achieve full function faster – announced the launch of the Evolution revision tibial system and Evolution BioFoam tibia. “MicroPort Orthopedics continues to grow its product portfolio with a steady cadence of product launches,” said Aurelio Sahagun, president of MicroPort

3D printed models shed light on treating heel deformities

Using 3D printed models of a patient’s foot, investigators at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles have found that the 3 leading procedures for treating heel deformities do not adequately correct the debilitating problem. Investigators used 18 identical 3D prints of a single patient’s heel to evaluate the most common techniques for treating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a genetic

Turns out people can hear prostheses attached to their skeletons

Attach prostheses directly to people’s skeletons, and they can actually hear vibrations in their implants, according to Swedish and Italian researchers. The discovery provides a better understanding of osseoperception – the way that people with osseointegrated prostheses can “feel” mechanical stimulation of the device. “Until now, the consensus was that the sense of touch played the primary role in

DSM introduces the first black medical-grade UHMWPE fiber

DSM Biomedical has released its Dyneema Purity Black fiber that is the first and only black ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) medical fiber. The black fiber builds upon what Dyneema Purity fibers are known for like strength, being that it is 15 times stronger than steel. It also has a small profile, high pliability and

Total disc replacement could have a problem: Here’s why

Total disc replacement (TDR) has the potential to replace fusion as the gold standard for treatment of painful degenerative disc disease. However, complications after TDR have been associated with wear and tear, including accelerated polyethylene wear. Retrieval data published in 2012 revealed that the wear and tear, called impingement issues, have occurred in many designs, which can lead

Failure to thrive: Lessons learned from medtech innovations that missed the mark

Some of the medical device industry’s most heralded disruptors wound up being its biggest failures. Here’s what we can learn from their mistakes. Fink Densford, Associate Editor No one in medtech sets out to fail. No one invests in building a device believing that, despite years of research and development, it won’t make the cut.

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This new hydrogel can regrow bone in skulls

Researchers in Illinois say they were able to regrow bone to repair a hole in a mouse’s skull. The researchers, based at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, think their work could lead to significant improvement in the care of people with severe skull or face trauma. They say they were able to regenerate skull bone