Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

Orthopedic implant coatings: This webinar will explore their application and development – Oct. 3

Tuesday, October 3, 2017 11:30am EST / 8:30am PST This webinar will explore the different types of orthopedic coatings and their typical applications. What are the benefits and limitations of each and when would you choose one over the other? We will also discuss why orthopedic coatings are used and new coating technologies under development.

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

How Consensus Orthopedics added smarts to orthopedic devices

Consensus Orthopedics made headlines with its TracPatch this year. So how did an ortho company get a digital product to market? Let’s face it, orthopedic devices are dumb. That is to say, they are mute. Silent. And in today’s healthcare environment, the silent kind of dumb is dangerous. Consensus Orthopedics (El Dorado Hills, Calif.) wanted to

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

CTL Medical wins FDA clearance for titanium cage device

CTL Medical Corp. (Dallas) recently announced that it has secured FDA clearance for its new Matisse titanium ACIF cage implant for spine fusion surgery. The device, which includes CTL Medical’s proprietary TiCro surface technology, has 200% greater endplate contact surface area, according to CTL. The Matisse also has bone-conforming geometry for better mechanical locking at the

Patients don’t have to lose weight for joint replacement surgeries

Obese patients who are having knee or hip replacement surgery don’t need to lose weight prior to surgery to reap the benefits, according to a new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “Our data shows it’s not necessary to ask patients to lose weight prior to surgery,” said Wenjun Li, lead author on

Who could replace Zimmer Biomet’s CEO?

Zimmer Biomet surprised this week with the announcement that CEO David Dvorak is immediately stepping down. So who will replace him? For now, the orthopedic device giant’s SVP and CFO Dan Florin will serve as interim CEO while the company’s board searches for a new permanent CEO. It is unclear whether Florin – who was VP and

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6

Stryker launches new deformity correction hardware

Stryker’s Foot and Ankle business unit announced that it is launching its Hoffman LRF Hexapod hardware and online application for deformity correction. The Hoffmann LFR Hexapod uses mathematical algorithms to calculate solutions to correct deformities. “Stryker’s Hoffman LRF Hexapod and its innovative software is a step forward for surgeons and patients involved with complex deformity

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

North American artificial disc replacement market to reach $614.5 million

The North American artificial disc replacement (ADR) market – which covers Canada, Mexico and the U.S. – is set to more than double from $274.6 million in 2016 to around $614.5 million by 2023, representing a compound annual growth rate of 12.2%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. The company’s latest report states that key

Engineered tissue could eliminate radiation for bone marrow transplants

University of California San Diego engineers have created artificial bone tissue that could eliminate the need for radiation before bone marrow transplants. Shyni Varghese, a bioengineering professor at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led a team to develop a bone-like implant to eliminate the pre-treatment radiation that kills stem cells in a patient’s bone

Micron Solutions boosts revenues, narrows losses in Q1

Precision medical device components maker Micron Solutions reported improvements with its finances during the first three months of 2017–even as it faced challenges related to validation requirements. “We have made several improvements in quality systems, capacity and our ability to meet customer requirements. We believe we have laid a solid foundation for further improvement and

Surgeon entrepreneur bets on virtual reality to boost surgical training

Dr. Justin Barad is a gamer, so it makes sense he would be drawn to virtual reality. As a high schooler, Barad started the computer science team. He interned at Activision, and was all set to be a game developer. But then Barad started to think about how he could help people. He ended up

Meet the computer-automated drill that cuts surgery time down to minutes

What do machining auto parts and speeding up cranial surgery have in common? Think a computer-driven drill that can produce fast, safe, clean cuts in complex surgical procedures. Such computer-automated drills, which have long been used in automotive technology, have the potential to speed surgeries by 50% or more. Researchers from the University of Utah