These 7 antique medical devices will make you shudder

It’s a good thing we live in the times of modern medicine. Historically, medical devices have been scary and unorthodox – and sometimes amounted to downright quackery. Surprisingly, a lot of these devices were thought to be useful in their era, long before the U.S. FDA started preapproving devices (which wasn’t until the 1970s). You

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Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 27, 2017

From RadiaDyne’s FDA expansion to NuVasive launching its new implants, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA expands indications for RadiaDyne’s OARtrac dose monitor RadiaDyne announced in an Oct. 24 press release that it has received additional FDA clearance for its upcoming OARtrac. The OARtrac allows

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 20, 2017

From InspireMD’s distribution deal to RenalGuard touting a new study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD inks Chile distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Oct. 12 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with CorpMedical Chile to distribute the MGuard Prime

The 11 most innovative medical devices of 2017

The nominees for the best medical technology of 2017 were recently announced for the 11th Annual Prix Galien USA Awards. The Galien Foundation, the host of the awards, hands out the the Prix Galien Award annually to examples of outstanding biomedical and technology product achievement designed to improve human condition. Before candidates can qualify for

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DSM Biomedical and Cerapedics partner for peptide enhanced bone graft

DSM Biomedical has partnered with Cerapedics to create and manufacture the next generation of peptide-enhanced bone graft. The partnerships allows for DSM’s regenerative materials capabilities to be used with Cerapedics’s proprietary synthetic small peptide (P-15) technology. Designed for fast and predictable remodeling in bone graft substitute applications, DSM’s newest bioceramic platform is make of a

What are orthopedic coatings?

Here are some important facts medical device designers need to know about orthopedic coatings, courtesy of Orchid. An orthopedic coating is used on implants to help improve the functionality of an implant. Usually, the coatings can help define the geometry and the mechanical strength of an implant, according to Orchid (Holt, Mich.). Coatings can be applied to

How Integer is creating cutting-edge disposable ortho surgical tools

With health providers increasingly demanding single-use devices, Integer successfully created disposable bone-cutting tools for its orthopedic device customers. Gary Victor, Integer Within healthcare today, there is a heightened focus on “value” – on the episode of care and the need to deliver improved patient care outcomes and lower overall costs. A related trend in the

Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

Orthopedic implant coatings: This webinar will explore their application and development

This webinar was recorded live on Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Click below to watch on demand.     This webinar will explore the different types of orthopedic coatings and their typical applications. What are the benefits and limitations of each and when would you choose one over the other? We will also discuss why orthopedic

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

How Consensus Orthopedics added smarts to orthopedic devices

Consensus Orthopedics made headlines with its TracPatch this year. So how did an ortho company get a digital product to market? Let’s face it, orthopedic devices are dumb. That is to say, they are mute. Silent. And in today’s healthcare environment, the silent kind of dumb is dangerous. Consensus Orthopedics (El Dorado Hills, Calif.) wanted to

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

CTL Medical wins FDA clearance for titanium cage device

CTL Medical Corp. (Dallas) recently announced that it has secured FDA clearance for its new Matisse titanium ACIF cage implant for spine fusion surgery. The device, which includes CTL Medical’s proprietary TiCro surface technology, has 200% greater endplate contact surface area, according to CTL. The Matisse also has bone-conforming geometry for better mechanical locking at the

Patients don’t have to lose weight for joint replacement surgeries

Obese patients who are having knee or hip replacement surgery don’t need to lose weight prior to surgery to reap the benefits, according to a new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “Our data shows it’s not necessary to ask patients to lose weight prior to surgery,” said Wenjun Li, lead author on