This pen can diagnose cancer in tissue in seconds

Scientists and engineers in Texas have created a pen-like device that can accurately recognize cancer in tissues during surgery. A team at the University of Texas at Austin has invented a tool used during surgeries that can give results in about 10 seconds, which is 150 times faster than current technology, according to the researchers.

Medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 15, 2017

From Acera Surgical and Telos Medical’s partnership to Xtant Medical’s 510(k) clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. Acera Surgical partners with Telos Medical for Restrata wound matrix trial Telos Partners announced in a Sept. 14 press release that Acera Surgical has chosen Telos to

Medtronic, Mazor Robotics close $40 million round

Mazor Robotics (NSDQ:MZOR) said today that closed the third, $40 million tranche of a deal with Medtronic (NYSE:MDT), which is due to take on exclusive global distribution rights for the Mazor X robot-assisted surgery device. It’s the third investment in the Israeli surgical robotics concern for Fridley, Minn.-based Medtronic, taking its total investment to $72 million, 10.6% stake in…

Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

Cambridge Medical Robotics unveils first look at Versius ‘bot

Cambridge Medical Robotics released the first photos today of its surgical robot, Versius, designed to make minimal access surgery more widely available and easier to perform. “We’ve designed Versius with surgeons in mind. By equipping them with a remarkable tool, fit for their demanding job, we can change the way surgery is delivered,” CEO Martin…

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 25, 2017

From InspireMD’s Swiss distribution deal to CoreLink’s stackable guide wire launch, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD announces Swiss distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Aug. 25 press release that it has signed an agreement with 1a Medical to distribute the CGuard EPS (Embolic

Soft, water-powered robot makes endoscopic surgery easier

Harvard researchers have created a rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes that can sense, flex and has multiple degrees of freedom. Flexible endoscopes fit through narrow passages to reach difficult parts of the body. Once they reach their target, the devices need rigid surgical tools to be able to manipulate or remove tissues. Researchers from Harvard’s

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

How a common hospital tool predicts poor outcomes after liver transplants

A frequently used tool in the hospital can be an indicator of which liver transplant recipients will do poorly after surgery, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Led by Vinay Sundaram, a team of researchers found that the nursing assessment called the Braden Scale could be put to use in liver transplant patients

Lab-engineered tissue is creating new digestive tract treatments

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have reported success with lab-engineered tissue replacements to treat digestive system diseases. The research team demonstrated the effectiveness of growing anal sphincters in a lab to treat an animal model for fecal incontinence. The success comes after the researchers reported success in implanting human-engineered intestines in rodents. “Results from both

This 3D printed implant replaces skull bone

A New Jersey doctor turned to Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Synthes and a 3D printed implant to replace missing skull bone in a patient. The procedure was performed after the patient suffered brain swelling and the skull became infected. Dr. Gaurav Gupta, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, had to

How slugs are creating better medical adhesives

Slug mucus is the inspiration behind a new adhesive to close surgical wounds and reduce the use of surgical staples, according to new research out of Harvard. Some of the current adhesives on the market can be toxic and stick together tissues weakly. Some can’t be used in wet environments altogether, which can pose a

Patients don’t have to lose weight for joint replacement surgeries

Obese patients who are having knee or hip replacement surgery don’t need to lose weight prior to surgery to reap the benefits, according to a new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “Our data shows it’s not necessary to ask patients to lose weight prior to surgery,” said Wenjun Li, lead author on

These antique surgical kits will make you glad you live today

Right about now, Indiana Jones is exclaiming: “They belong in a museum!” RR Auction house recently auctioned off antique surgical kits that a Harvard Medical School founder used during the American Revolution. The two kits, plus two other post Revolution-Era items sold for $104,000, CNN reports. Two kits were owned and used by Continental Army surgeon Dr.

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How to power handheld surgical devices

High energy lithium metal oxide (LMO) batteries enable handheld surgical devices to be small and ergonomic, allowing surgeons to operate quickly and efficiently to reduce fatigue. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Battery-powered devices now span the entire medical spectrum: automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), robotic inspection systems, infusion pumps, bone growth stimulators and other wearable devices, glucose