Why Flex is betting on stretchtronics for medtech

The wearable lab at Flex (formerly Flextronics) reports it’s making strides when it comes to creating devices that are transparent and seamless. “Usually when you think about healthcare, you picture a person in a bed with wires running all around. We think healthcare should be as easy as putting on a T-shirt,” said Flex CEO John

New synthetic muscle step forward for soft robotics

A research team from Columbia Engineering’s Creative Machines lab developed a synthetic soft muscle that has a strain density 15 times larger than natural muscle and can lift 1,000 times its own weight that could propel soft robotics creation forward. According to the study “Soft Material for Soft Actuators” published in Nature Communications, the material…

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

How electrical currents could monitor lung functions from an ICU bed

Electrical currents from an electrode-filled belt could soon help monitor important bodily functions like lung function, according to Austrian researchers. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a new imaging technique created by a collaboration between Technische Universität Wien, Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna. The electrode-filled belt is applied directly on

Study: artificial ‘skin’ could improve robot sensing

Researchers have found a material that can mimic human skin and improve robots’ sensing capabilities. Usually rigid semiconductor materials that create robots’ circuits limit the machines’ movement or sensing, either because they are not flexible or don’t permit electrons to flow efficiently. But the rubber electronics and sensors tested by a University of Houston team…

Heraeus Medical Components acquires Biotectix

Heraeus Medical Components is acquiring conductive polymer materials maker Biotectix. The deal, announced yesterday, will allow Heraeus to boost its medical electrode coating capabilities. Better electrode coatings equal better performance of sensing and stimulation electrodes used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical devices. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. “We constantly work with our medical

BMZ Group opening new center to develop batteries

BMZ Group will open its E.Volution Center next month in Aschaffenburg, Germany. The addition will include 150 developers focused on creating the energy storage systems of the future. Under chief technical officer Dirk Oestreich’s leadership, the company plans to develop 200 new battery systems that can be used in medical products, cars, bicycles and more.

New biocompatible batteries harvest energy from the body

University of Maryland engineers have created a biocompatible battery that uses the same ion-based electrical energy that is present in all living things – including humans. Sodium, potassium and other electrolytes are constantly flowing through our bodies and creating electrical signals. The electrical signals are what power the brain and help control the rhythm of

Schurter announces solid state SMD fuse for demanding applications

Schurter recently announced its new High Current Fuse (HCF), which it is touting as a robust SMD fuse. The High Current fuse uses solid-state, thin-film technology.  It has fast-reacting breaking capacity rated 1000 A at 125 VAC/ 125 VDC, over a current range of 5 A to 15A. Schurter (Santa Rosa, Calif.) says the HCF

10 reasons to keep your printed circuit board production in the U.S.

Dennis Vetrano, Polaris Contract Manufacturing, Inc. – A Lockheed Martin Company Although the lure of low-cost labor is tempting, offshoring production of printed circuit boards can lead a company into a host of problems. Firms can find themselves dealing with increased costs, regulatory hurdles and pitfalls relating to quality control. Here are 10 reasons why:

This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

How glass-sealed connectors increase medical device longevity

As medical instruments and technologies grow more sophisticated and complex, it is increasingly important to guard sensitive components from the autoclaving process while supporting their longevity. Glass offers a solution. Jochen Herzberg, Schott Electronic Packaging In today’s era of rapid technological advancement, medical devices have become more complex and capable than ever thanks to the

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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