Schurter announces solid state SMD fuse for demanding applications

Schurter recently announced its new High Current Fuse (HCF), which it is touting as a robust SMD fuse. The High Current fuse uses solid-state, thin-film technology.  It has fast-reacting breaking capacity rated 1000 A at 125 VAC/ 125 VDC, over a current range of 5 A to 15A. Schurter (Santa Rosa, Calif.) says the HCF

10 reasons to keep your printed circuit board production in the U.S.

Dennis Vetrano, Polaris Contract Manufacturing, Inc. – A Lockheed Martin Company Although the lure of low-cost labor is tempting, offshoring production of printed circuit boards can lead a company into a host of problems. Firms can find themselves dealing with increased costs, regulatory hurdles and pitfalls relating to quality control. Here are 10 reasons why:

This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

How glass-sealed connectors increase medical device longevity

As medical instruments and technologies grow more sophisticated and complex, it is increasingly important to guard sensitive components from the autoclaving process while supporting their longevity. Glass offers a solution. Jochen Herzberg, Schott Electronic Packaging In today’s era of rapid technological advancement, medical devices have become more complex and capable than ever thanks to the

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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10 companies with interesting technology at BIOMEDevice Boston

Updated May 5, 2017 BIOMEDevice Boston provided an opportunity for over 4,000 engineers and executives and 400 suppliers in New England’s design and manufacturing industry to connect. It annual event is an industry showcase created by UBM in partnership with Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council (MassMEDIC). The event – which ran May 3–4 at the Boston

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5 things you need to know to make connected medical devices

Bill Welch, Phillips-Medisize The estimated number of connected medical devices – devices connected to the Internet –is expected to increase from 10 billion to 50 billion over the next decade, according to the IBM Institute for Business Value. This is due to the ability for machine-to-machine communication through cloud computing and networks of data-gathering sensors,

Wellness entrepreneur explains his vision – and surviving a deadly brain tumor

Avi Yaron is no ordinary entrepreneur, but he is definitely an engineer. When diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor, he met the challenge by inventing the solution to his own illness. Instead of optic mechanics, he used small silicon chips that mimic an insect eye. These enabled a camera to provide access to both the right and

New requirements you should know for medical EMC

Plan now to ensure your medical devices comply with new EMC requirements by the December 2018 effective date. Since the development cycle can be 2-3 years, it is important to understand the new IEC 60601-1-2 EMC 4th Edition standard now when designing medical devices. To provide you guidance on these important changes and improve your

This contact lenses breakthrough could enable glucose monitoring

Biosensing contact lenses may not be able to self-heal like “The Terminator,” but they could measure blood glucose and detect other signs of disease in the future. Oregon State University researchers are set to present a study that suggests transparent biosensors that are embedded into contact lenses could provide insight for doctors and patients without

‘Electronic tattoos’: Could they be the future of wearables?

Japanese researchers have pushed the boundaries even further when it comes to flexible electronics for wearable medical devices. They say they used a household inkjet printer without soldering to produce 750 nm–thin elastomeric sheets that feel like “electronic tattoos.” The result of the Waseda University researchers’ work was ultrathin stick-on electronic devices using elastomeric “nanosheet” film.

SunTech’s Oscar 2 ABPM features patient diary app

The next-generation Oscar 2 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring system from SunTech Medical is meant to further increase efficacies for general practitioners, clinicians, cardiologists and pharmaceutical researchers. The new SunTech Oscar 2 is now available with the True24 ABPM Patient Diary mobile app, which links to the Oscar 2 via Bluetooth. The True24 app provides

CES 2017: Medical technologies you need to know

Danielle Kirsh, MDO Assistant Editor Updated Jan. 6, 2017 The year’s biggest tech event—the annual Consumer Electronics Show—has been about eye-popping television displays, driverless cars, wireless audio and, of course, a host of wearables and other mobile health devices. Some of the claims should be taken with a grain of salt. (Anyone ever heard of

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