Infertility: There could be a 3D printing solution

New Northwestern University research offers a potential 3D printing solution for women’s infertility – providing hope for cancer survivors who want to start families. The Northwestern researchers successfully 3D printed a bioprosthetic mouse ovary that ovulated when implanted inside a live mouse. Mice with the bioprosthetic ovaries were able to give birth to live pups,

New CollPlant division focuses on 3D bioprinting

Regenerative medicine company CollPlant said Thursday that it has created a new division to focus on collagen-based bioprinting. CollPlant has been utilizing its proprietary plant-based rhCollagen technology for tissue repair. The new division will further develop collagen-based bioink for use in 3D printers creating organs and tissues. The Ness Ziona, Israel–based company says it has 3D

Webinar: Reducing risk through material science

Join us for a free, live webinar with Battelle on June 15th at 2 p.m. Eastern time.     Medical device material failures are common and costly. Fortunately, the risk of these failures can be greatly reduced through better understanding of materials science earlier in the product development cycle, preventing both delays and post market

How Proto Labs is helping to make bioabsorbable surgical staples

Quick-turn contract manufacturer Proto Labs is playing an important role helping Opus KSD (Peacham, Vt.) ramp up production of  SubQ It! – a disposable, handheld surgical stapler that uses bioabsorbable fasteners beneath the skin. Health practitioners generally use bioabsorbable, thread-like material or a surgical stapler with metal staples to close the small openings created during laparoscopic surgery.

Clariant touts latest Mevopur high-temp medical fluoropolymers

Specialty chemical company Clariant is focusing on the latest additions to its compounding capabilities for high-temperature, medical fluoropolymers in Booth 620 at the BIOMEDevice 2017 conference in Boston, May 3–4, 2017. Clariant recently completed a significant expansion at its plant in Lewiston, Maine, adding equipment that increases its capacity to compound high-temperature fluoropolymers, which include

10 companies with interesting technology at BIOMEDevice Boston

Updated May 5, 2017 BIOMEDevice Boston provided an opportunity for over 4,000 engineers and executives and 400 suppliers in New England’s design and manufacturing industry to connect. It annual event is an industry showcase created by UBM in partnership with Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council (MassMEDIC). The event – which ran May 3–4 at the Boston

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6 ways hydrogels are enabling medtech innovation

Hydrogels are water-based biomaterials developed specifically for human use, according to a Biomaterials journal article. They are a water-swollen polymeric material that doesn’t change its distinct 3D structure. They are formed from super-absorbent, chain-like polymers and are not soluble in water. However, their porous surface allows for nutrients and cell waste to pass through. They have

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DSM introduces the first black medical-grade UHMWPE fiber

DSM Biomedical has released its Dyneema Purity Black fiber that is the first and only black ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) medical fiber. The black fiber builds upon what Dyneema Purity fibers are known for like strength, being that it is 15 times stronger than steel. It also has a small profile, high pliability and

3 new wound dressings you should know

Surgical dressings are designed to control post-operation bleeding, absorb exudate, ease pain and provide protection for the wound, according to an article relayed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. If properly taken care of, surgical dressings prevent surgical site infections. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, the chances of developing a post-surgical wound infection ranges from

This contact lenses breakthrough could enable glucose monitoring

Biosensing contact lenses may not be able to self-heal like “The Terminator,” but they could measure blood glucose and detect other signs of disease in the future. Oregon State University researchers are set to present a study that suggests transparent biosensors that are embedded into contact lenses could provide insight for doctors and patients without

Aerospace may have something to teach medtech about materials: Here’s how

QuesTek Innovations has used advanced computer modeling to produce innovative materials in the aerospace sector. Now it’s looking to recreate the same magic in the medical device space. Chris Newmarker, Managing Editor Medical device developers typically turn to off-the-shelf materials and then design based on the properties of the materials. But does it have to

Boston Sci giving lift to new erectile dysfunction device

Want to put some lead in your pencil? Try nitinol instead. The wonder metal—a nickel-titanium alloy with heat-activated shape memory—has proved essential for Wisconsin and Illinois researchers building what British tabloids are calling a “bionic penis.” Chuckles aside, the proposed implant has enough potential advantages over existing erectile dysfunction treatment implants that Boston Scientific officials

Tyber launches TyPEEK lateral implant system

Tyber Medical, a privately held company focused on developing innovative medical devices for private label opportunities and advancing the science of bioengineered surfaces, announces the full commercial launch of its lateral access system, 2nd generation lateral PEEK/titanium composite interbody, and lateral plating system. The Tyber Medical lateral access retractor employs a popular 3-blade design for

New blow molding technology gives makers of medical bags and bottles access to economic and performance advantages of TPEs

FGH Systems and Teknor Apex have developed material, equipment, tooling and mold technologies for high-volume extrusion blow molding of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), making possible a more efficient and lower-cost alternative to latex and nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR). Cooperating over a period of years, Teknor Apex and FGH Systems perfected technologies to meet the challenges posed

Using magnetic nanoparticles to detect cancer’s early traces

Nanoscale magnets offer a new way to find faint, early traces of cancer in patients, according to Rice University students working on a method to capitalize on the magnets’ properties. Three Rice computational and applied mathematics students are refining a program to analyze magnetic relaxometry signals from iron-oxide nanoparticles that find and attach themselves to