Biosafe Defenses patents light-activated disinfectant

Biosafe Defenses has recently patented a new line of light-activated antibacterial disinfectant after 10 years of research. The patent allows Biosafe Defenses to use a method of disinfecting objects with light-activated conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) that can inactivate and destroy molds, viruses, fungal yeast and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Biosafe Defenses can also make an antimicrobial substrate like

New synthetic muscle step forward for soft robotics

A research team from Columbia Engineering’s Creative Machines lab developed a synthetic soft muscle that has a strain density 15 times larger than natural muscle and can lift 1,000 times its own weight that could propel soft robotics creation forward. According to the study “Soft Material for Soft Actuators” published in Nature Communications, the material…

How squid ink could make going to the dentist painless

Squid ink could be used as a new imaging method at the dentist to check for gum disease, according to new research from the University of California at San Diego. Combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, engineers at UCSD have created a new dental imaging method that can painlessly and non-invasively examine a patient’s

Study: artificial ‘skin’ could improve robot sensing

Researchers have found a material that can mimic human skin and improve robots’ sensing capabilities. Usually rigid semiconductor materials that create robots’ circuits limit the machines’ movement or sensing, either because they are not flexible or don’t permit electrons to flow efficiently. But the rubber electronics and sensors tested by a University of Houston team…

Minnesota Rubber and Plastics touting elastomers at MD&M Minneapolis

Minnesota Rubber and Plastics announced that it will be showcasing its Quniton materials and Qmonix elastomer at MD&M Minneapolis on Nov. 8–9. The Quniton materials are designed for medical developers who need high-performance lubricious materials with permanent, low coefficient of friction surface properties. It minimizes friction, wear and abrasion in medical valves, plungers, caps and

Elkem Silicones showcasing biomedical silicone rubbers at DeviceTalks Boston

Elkem Silicones (Oslo, Norway) is a fully integrated silicone manufacturing company. The company, owned by China National Bluestar, has R&D laboratories, production sites and sales offices in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia Pacific. Featured technologies: High consistency silicone rubber & biomedical liquid silicone rubber Silbione Biomedical Liquid Silicone Rubber: Silbione Biomedical Liquid Silicone Rubber (LSR)

Orthopedic implant coatings: This webinar will explore their application and development

This webinar was recorded live on Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Click below to watch on demand.     This webinar will explore the different types of orthopedic coatings and their typical applications. What are the benefits and limitations of each and when would you choose one over the other? We will also discuss why orthopedic

This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues

Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and

Fluoropolymer medical tubing: What you need to know

Here are some important considerations when it comes to extrusion equipment and safety related to processing fluoropolymer medical tubing. Steve Maxson, Graham Engineering Corp. Medical tubing processors are showing more interest when it comes to venturing into the world of fluoropolymers – and for good reason. Materials such as FEP, PFA, PVDF and ETFE are

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

How to ensure adhesion on hard-to-bond plastic substrates

Medical device companies are increasingly using plastic substrates that are tough and sterilization/chemical resistant. But they also come with adhesion challenges. Michelle Gumbert and Patrick Vaughn, Dymax  For medical devices such as catheters, prefilled syringes, vials, test tubes and injector pens, many manufacturers are turning to plastic substrates that are specifically formulated to resist harsh

Allergan gel-based stents are treating glaucoma

An Allergan-developed gelatin-based stent is showing potential to treat glaucoma in a quicker and safer environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. Glaucoma is a disease that damages the eye’s optic nerve and can cause vision loss and blindness. Medicines in the form of eyedrops or pills can be used to treat

How new chemistry is making medical imaging better

Researchers recently stumbled upon a chemical mechanism that could be used to make radioactive tracers, according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The discovery resulted in an alternative way to create chemical compounds that are beneficial to noninvasive, high-resolution, 3D medical imaging technology like positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

This new nanochip technology can reprogram human cells

Ohio State University researchers have developed a nanochip technology that they say can create any cell type for treatment within the human body. The new technology, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), can repair injured tissue and restore the function of aging tissue like organs, blood vessels and nerve cells. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured