Laird touts liquid cooling systems for medical imaging equipment

Laird is touting its custom, self-contained liquid cooling systems (LCS) that provide precise temperature control in medical imaging equipment like CT scanners, PET scanners and MRI scanners. Liquid cooling systems provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) that ensures efficient, low power operation to maximize uptime and optimize the performance of medical imaging equipment, according to

United Soft Plastics signs distribution deal with Foster Corp.

Foster Corp. has been appointed the North American distributor of United Soft Plastics’ Ubisoft styrenic block copolymers, effective as of Nov. 1. Under the deal, Foster Corp. will give sales, technical and order fulfillment support to customers out of their Nevada and Connecticut facilities. Styrenic block copolymers are thermoplastic elastomers designed for healthcare markets. They

The Lee Co. redesigns dispense pumps

The Lee Co. (Westbrook, Conn.) has redesigned some of its dispense pumps for in vitro diagnostics and scientific instrument applications. The LPD series precision dispense pumps are designed to have consistent performance and cost savings while fitting into a compact, lightweight package. They’re also designed to be maintenance free. LPD series precision dispense pumps are

Expanding design horizons with gas-assist molding

Scott Rishell, Mack Molding Gas-assist molding, the process of using nitrogen gas pressure to fully form a part, increases design and manufacturing options for injection molded components. Traditional plastic processing brings design and manufacturing benefits through repeatable, high-volume and high-quality part production coupled with cost reductions, but its versatility can be expanded in certain scenarios

Imagining the future of heart pump technology

Since its introduction more than 50 years ago, the left ventricular assist device has evolved from being a temporary solution to a long-term option for patients recovering from heart failure. Now, companies are engineering the LVAD of the future to be smaller and more adaptable for individual patients. Dr. John O’Connell, Abbott For more than

How advanced lithium batteries enable medical devices to be miniaturized

Lithium batteries are allowing medical devices to become smaller and more ergonomic without sacrificing power or performance. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Modern medical devices are become increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized, demanding more for advanced battery-powered solutions. Lithium batteries are paving the way by powering a wide variety of medical devices, including automatic external defibrillators, surgical

Incorporating steerability into your catheter: Here’s what you need to know

Here are seven key design and development considerations you need to keep in mind for catheters with steerability. Anthony Appling, Freudenberg Medical As medical technology continues to advance, physicians who specialize in minimally invasive procedures also have advancing expectations. They want better performance and improved functionality in the catheters and delivery systems they use. One

How to mitigate heating in a handheld surgical tool

Here are two main sources of power losses, and hence heating, when it comes to handheld surgical tool motors. Urs Kafader, Maxon Motor Motors operated at the rated torque limit can get very hot. In continuous operation, the winding can reach 155 °C, resulting in a housing temperature of some 120 °C. No surgeon would

How to add recyclability and sustainability into medtech plastics

Recyclability and sustainability have become very important to the medical device marketplace, and some companies are taking note. Jason Middleton, Ray Products Sustainability has become critical to medical businesses. Some implement sustainability to appeal to consumers. Others look to cut costs or align their business practices with their company mission. Whatever the motivation, 13% of company

These speedy BD robot arms store and retrieve medications in seconds

It’s not difficult to see hospitals and pharmacies challenged by dispensing thousands of drugs with speed and accuracy. As the number of drugs rises, so do security issues. To address both, the Rowa Division of BD in Germany has introduced two machines. The Rowa Vmax provides for the automatic storage and retrieval of boxed pharmaceuticals

DSM Biomedical and Cerapedics partner for peptide enhanced bone graft

DSM Biomedical has partnered with Cerapedics to create and manufacture the next generation of peptide-enhanced bone graft. The partnerships allows for DSM’s regenerative materials capabilities to be used with Cerapedics’s proprietary synthetic small peptide (P-15) technology. Designed for fast and predictable remodeling in bone graft substitute applications, DSM’s newest bioceramic platform is make of a

How to select a micro-MIM supplier

With the development of increasingly smaller medical devices comes the challenge of identifying the best supplier and manufacturing method to meet extremely tight tolerances. Raghu Vadlamudi, Donatelle With the development of increasingly smaller medical devices comes the challenge of identifying the best supplier and manufacturing method to meet extremely tight tolerances. Millimeter-sized components with micron-sized

Sensirion completes development of single-use liquid flow sensor

Sensirion has announced that product development for its single-use liquid flow sensor LD20 has been completed and is ready for production. The flow sensor is designed to quickly and precisely measure the lowest flow rates and has already received a number of international awards. The sensor is compact and cost-effective and can be used for

The trouble with tooling LSR and how to get molding costs down

Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) is great for medical device applications, but is the tooling worth the trouble? Dave Theiss, Robin Industries Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) is a sought-after material for medical applications. But there are tooling challenges and expenses associated with LSR that need to be understood by medical manufacturers looking to use the material.

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number