This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues

Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and

BMZ Group opening new center to develop batteries

BMZ Group will open its E.Volution Center next month in Aschaffenburg, Germany. The addition will include 150 developers focused on creating the energy storage systems of the future. Under chief technical officer Dirk Oestreich’s leadership, the company plans to develop 200 new battery systems that can be used in medical products, cars, bicycles and more.

Medical Extrusion Technologies loses trademark bid

A U.S. trademark board last week shot down a bid by Medical Extrusion Technologies to trademark its name, ruling that the name is not distinct enough to trademark. MET applied to trademark its name for “polyurethanes in the form of sheets, films, pellets, granules, and tubes for use in the manufacture of medical devices, medical diagnostic devices,

Fluoropolymer medical tubing: What you need to know

Here are some important considerations when it comes to extrusion equipment and safety related to processing fluoropolymer medical tubing. Steve Maxson, Graham Engineering Corp. Medical tubing processors are showing more interest when it comes to venturing into the world of fluoropolymers – and for good reason. Materials such as FEP, PFA, PVDF and ETFE are

New biocompatible batteries harvest energy from the body

University of Maryland engineers have created a biocompatible battery that uses the same ion-based electrical energy that is present in all living things – including humans. Sodium, potassium and other electrolytes are constantly flowing through our bodies and creating electrical signals. The electrical signals are what power the brain and help control the rhythm of

GI Plastek expands in-house capabilities

GI Plastek (Wolfeboro, N.H.) – a specialist in large to medium complex molded products – announced this month that it has significantly expanded its in-house electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI) shielding capabilities. GI Plastek’s new mechanized production paint line is housed in a new 9,000-square-foot paint facility. The paint line allows GI Platek

Medical extrusion conference to be held outside Minneapolis

The Spotlight Medical Extrusion & Secondary Operations Conference will be held Nov. 7 at the Marriott Minneapolis West in St. Louis Park, Minn., according to its organizer Steve Maxson, Graham Engineering Corp.’s director of business development for extrusion. “The focus of our Spotlight conferences is on medical extrusion and secondary operations such as over-molding and tipping for catheters and

Schurter announces solid state SMD fuse for demanding applications

Schurter recently announced its new High Current Fuse (HCF), which it is touting as a robust SMD fuse. The High Current fuse uses solid-state, thin-film technology.  It has fast-reacting breaking capacity rated 1000 A at 125 VAC/ 125 VDC, over a current range of 5 A to 15A. Schurter (Santa Rosa, Calif.) says the HCF

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

10 reasons to keep your printed circuit board production in the U.S.

Dennis Vetrano, Polaris Contract Manufacturing, Inc. – A Lockheed Martin Company Although the lure of low-cost labor is tempting, offshoring production of printed circuit boards can lead a company into a host of problems. Firms can find themselves dealing with increased costs, regulatory hurdles and pitfalls relating to quality control. Here are 10 reasons why:

What is the hardest thing about medtech IoT?

The medtech IoT space is fraught with decisions that can make or break a product launch. There are several points at which developers in the space might want to throw their hands up or put their head under the covers. We asked some device experts to share their toughest lessons from IoT in the medical

4 ways wearables will transform healthcare’s future

Wearable technology is moving beyond consumer-grade health and wellness devices – the daily step counters and heart rate trackers offered by the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. “They’re convenient, small, portable and inexpensive, but you don’t use consumer items for life and death,” said Dr. Arthur Combs, chief medical officer at flexible electronics company MC10

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How to ensure adhesion on hard-to-bond plastic substrates

Medical device companies are increasingly using plastic substrates that are tough and sterilization/chemical resistant. But they also come with adhesion challenges. Michelle Gumbert and Patrick Vaughn, Dymax  For medical devices such as catheters, prefilled syringes, vials, test tubes and injector pens, many manufacturers are turning to plastic substrates that are specifically formulated to resist harsh

7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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Allergan gel-based stents are treating glaucoma

An Allergan-developed gelatin-based stent is showing potential to treat glaucoma in a quicker and safer environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. Glaucoma is a disease that damages the eye’s optic nerve and can cause vision loss and blindness. Medicines in the form of eyedrops or pills can be used to treat