Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

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From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention.

1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device

BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating a pediatric capability for its BrainScope One medical neurotechnology. The technology is an FDA-cleared handheld medical device that is designed to assess the full spectrum of traumatic brain injury. The company says that the pediatric version of its BrainScope One will be similar to the one that is currently available. The current device is easy-to-use and rapid and helps clinicians assess whether a patient has a structural brain injury that can be visible on a CT scan or if a patient has function brain impairment like a concussion.

2. BoneSupport inks French distribution deal

BoneSupport announced that it has signed a distribution deal with Novomedics, according to a Sept. 7 press release. The distribution deal intends to help BoneSupport gain access to the French market with its Cerament product line of bone void filler, Cerement G and Cerament V. The commercialization agreement allows for BoneSupport’s products to be sold in 8 key European markets while also directly marketing its products in five European countries in the U.K., Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Denmark.

3. AliveCor touts Kardia study

AliveCor announced in a Sept. 6 press release the results of four clinical research presentations for its digital EKG, Kardia Mobile. Kardia is a hyperfast, 30-second digital EKG that uses artificial intelligence, mobile, cloud and microelectrode technology to help patients manage heart health. It helps patients and care teams easily, quickly and inexpensively detect and manage possible atrial fibrillation. The study found that people who used Kardia Mobile had a fourfold increase in atrial fibrillation detection. It also showed that the mobile device had an accuracy that was similar to what physicians can offer. It was able to detect more patients who had atrial fibrillation that had previously gone undiagnosed. The patients who participated in the study also reported that Kardia Mobile was easy to use.

Get the full story on our sister site, MassDevice.

DeviceTalks West: Expertise you need to know

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