Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

Using robot assistance in neurosurgery for faster seizure mapping

Head shaved, a little boy rests on the operating table, deep under anesthesia. His parents have brought him to Boston Children’s Hospital in hopes of determining the cause of his seizures. Now, neurosurgeons Scellig Stone, MD, PhD, Joseph Madsen, MD, and their colleagues in the Epilepsy Center are performing a procedure designed to monitor seizure

7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

New non-invasive brain stimulation method could treat autism and more

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have figured out how to non-invasively deliver electrical stimulation to specific parts of the brain. In collaboration with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the IT’IS Foundation, the MIT researchers have placed electrodes on the scalps of patients to stimulate regions that are deep in the brain, making a

Researchers claim 100% cancer detection rate

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center say they have developed a multimodal optical spectroscopy probe that could provide better detection of common forms of cancer, enabling longer life expectancies and lower risk of recurrence. The team, which began work on the probe in 2015, have refined the invention and designed a new

Are we closer to a game-changing device for Parkinson’s disease?

University of Washington researchers say they’ve developed an advanced deep brain stimulation system to treat essential tremor and Parkinson’s without constantly being “on,” allowing for longer battery life and better treatment. The system utilizes electrodes on top of the brain to sense movement in parts of the body that experience essential tremor, alongside a deep

Algorithms gather brain data to train brain surgeons

Researchers in Europe have developed mathematical models and numerical algorithms that break down medical images like Lego bricks to help guide surgeons during brain surgery. University of Luxembourg and University of Strasbourg researchers collaborated to create algorithms to predict the deformation of the brain during surgery and give information pertaining to the current position of

Renishaw brings its stereotactic robot to Canada

The London Health Sciences Center in London, Ontario, has installedRenishaw’s Neuromate stereotactic robot, the first instance of the robot in Canada. The procedure was a stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG), which uses an intracerebral electrode to measure electrical signals in the brain. The goal of the procedure is to figure out which part of the brain generate the sudden

6 brain-controlled devices helping people regain movement

People who have lost feeling in their limbs or have lost the ability to move them may soon have those sensations restored thanks to a slew of recent brain-controlled device innovations. While we are moving toward less invasive methods such as electrode-filled caps on the head, there are still more invasive implants that are benefiting

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Cleveland Clinic, Boston Sci think deep brain stimulation can treat strokes

The Cleveland Clinic is pioneering deep brain stimulation for stroke recovery, with an ongoing clinical trial to determine if Boston Scientific’s Vercise DBS system improves movement in recovering stroke patients. Dr. Andre Machado and his team performed the 6-hour deep brain stimulation surgery on Dec. 19, 2016. The procedure implanted electrodes into the cerebellum section

Meet the computer-automated drill that cuts surgery time down to minutes

What do machining auto parts and speeding up cranial surgery have in common? Think a computer-driven drill that can produce fast, safe, clean cuts in complex surgical procedures. Such computer-automated drills, which have long been used in automotive technology, have the potential to speed surgeries by 50% or more. Researchers from the University of Utah

Why ‘do no harm’ matters more than ever

A recent Retro Report in The New York Times looked back at the tragic history of lobotomies to remind viewers of the importance of the medical ethics principle, “First, do no harm,” and how it applies to the development of medical technologies for the brain today. The media positively covered lobotomies as a groundbreaking procedure able to cure

11 surgical robotics companies you need to know

Fink Densford, Associate Editor Robotic surgery is taking off, and the field is becoming increasingly diverse. We’ve collected information on the biggest players in the field so far. Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci robot remains the premier surgical robotics company, with other companies including Stryker and Zimmer-Biomet only getting into the field in recent years. Read on

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Medtronic launches trial for Visualase MRI-Guided laser ablation device in epilepsy patients

Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today that the 1st procedure using the Visualase MRI-Guided laser ablation system has been performed in its SLATE clinical trial evaluating the device in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The trial is slated to enroll 120 patients with MTLE, the most common form of epilepsy. Researchers will observe the patients