Enabling micro-sensors for next-gen interactive implants

CerMet – an advanced ceramic and metal technology system – creates the potential for implantable devices with thousands of electrical channels. Think new options for treating blindness and neurological conditions. Only a few years old, Heraeus’ CerMet is upping the game when it comes to sophisticated implantable electronic devices. “Medical implants manufactured using the Heraeus CerMet

Patient with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Patients who have lost mobility in their legs due to complete spinal cord injury could soon regain lost motor function below the level of injury, thanks to new research out of the University of Louisville. Motor function was recovered after study participants received long-term activity-based training and spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). After approximately 34.5

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 13, 2017

From Orthocell’s distribution deal to CorNeat unveiling its artificial cornea, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. OrthoCell inks Australian distro deal Orthocell announced in an Oct. 10 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with Surgical Specialities. The deal will make Surgical Specialities the

Is this the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves?

Nanofiber fabrication may be the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves with regenerative and growth potential, according to new research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. A research team led by Kevin Kit Parker created a valve-shaped nanofiber network that replicates the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).

How artificial neural coding could create advanced prosthetics

Researchers are artificially making neural coding to build advanced prosthetics, thanks to research from the University of Illinois. Coordinated Science Lab (CSL) researchers at the University of Illinois have mathematically figured out how the brain times impulses that are sent out due to a sensory stimulus. “There was a major question in neuron function that

5 innovative medical devices designed by students

The Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) just released its list of the 2017 IDEA award-winning designed products. The winners in the medical device category included several interesting devices. But what really caught our eye was the Student Designs category, which featured several noteworthy medical innovations. These devices were interesting because of their focus on

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Lamborghini is helping to create better prosthetics

Automobili Lamborghini is collaborating with Houston Methodist Research Institute to bring its carbon fiber composite material expertise to prosthetic implants. The research that Lamborghini will be joining is a biocompatibility study of the composite materials that are used in prosthetic implants and subcutaneous devices. The goal of the study is to be able to determine

How to treat involuntary eye movement with magnets

Magnets implanted behind the eye of a patient have been used to treat involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus, according to new research from the University College London (UCL) and the University of Oxford. The research team implanted a set of magnets in the eye socket beneath each eye in a patient who has nystagmus.

This wooden toe could be one of the oldest prosthetics in the world

University of Basel Egyptologists have reexamined what they claim is one of the oldest prosthetic devices in human history to determine its origin. A wooden big toe, thought to be almost 3,000 years old, was discovered in a female burial in the necropolis of Sheikh ´Abd el-Qurna near Luxor. Using microscopy, X-ray technology and computer

New surgical technique makes prosthetic limbs feel real

MIT researchers have developed a new surgical technique that makes prosthetic limbs feel like real limbs. It could also help reduce the rejection rate of prosthetic limbs. “We’re talking about a dramatic improvement in patient care,” said Hugh Herr, a professor of media arts and sciences and senior author on the study, in a press

Why prosthetics need tactile feedback

Tactile feedback enabled blindfolded test subjects to more than double their ability to determine the size of objects they grasped with a prosthetic hand, according to U.S. and Italian engineers. “Humans have an innate sense of how the parts of their bodies are positioned, even if they can’t see them,” said Marcia O’Malley, professor of

3D printing is stransforming maxillofacial surgeries: Here’s how

Customized, 3D models for pre-surgical preparations are transforming maxillofacial surgical procedures in the U.K. – thanks to Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing. Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, U.K. is using Stratasys’ Objet Eden350V 3D Printer and has reported having an up to 93% reduction in surgical planning time that comes with standard anatomical models. They have

Ambionics creates 3D printed prosthetic arm for infants

Using Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology, prosthetic solutions company Ambionics was able to create a fully-functional 3D printed hydraulic prosthetic arm for an infant. The prosthetic was designed for Ambionics’ founder Ben Ryan’s 2-year-old son, enabling a more natural acceptance of prosthetics for children. So far, the 3D-printed hydraulic prosthetic has delivered 76% cost savings

This new bionic hand reacts automatically: Here’s how

British researchers are trying out a new bionic hand that they’ve developed that allows the wearer to reach out and grasp objects automatically – without the user consciously thinking – mimicking how people fluidly react to with the world around them. The key to allowing the hand to do this was a camera. The biomedical engineers at Newcastle

Turns out people can hear prostheses attached to their skeletons

Attach prostheses directly to people’s skeletons, and they can actually hear vibrations in their implants, according to Swedish and Italian researchers. The discovery provides a better understanding of osseoperception – the way that people with osseointegrated prostheses can “feel” mechanical stimulation of the device. “Until now, the consensus was that the sense of touch played the primary role in