Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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How targeting a gene mutation could treat aggressive lung cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a gene mutation that could help treat an aggressive form of lung cancer that is known to be “undruggable.” Gene mutations in the KEAP1 gene could help treat mutations in the KRAS gene that causes certain lung cancer types to be undruggable. KEAP1 mutations occur with

Spinal cord stimulator could curb opioid prescriptions: Here’s how

The first implantation of Nuvectra’s Algovita Spinal Cord Stimulation System was recently performed in Northern California. The FDA-approved Algovita SCS System was able to successfully treat a injured veteran’s chronic pain to reduce the use of opioids to battle the pain. “Following injuries sustained in the line of duty, this particular patient had multiple surgeries

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 13, 2017

From Orthocell’s distribution deal to CorNeat unveiling its artificial cornea, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. OrthoCell inks Australian distro deal Orthocell announced in an Oct. 10 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with Surgical Specialities. The deal will make Surgical Specialities the

7 breast cancer breakthroughs you need to know

As we mark another Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s worth noting the recent strides that have been made when it comes to diagnosing and treating the disease. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women in the U.S. Affecting one in eight women, breast cancer will be accountable for about 40,610 deaths

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Mini lab-made kidneys help track polycystic kidney disease

University of Washington researchers created mini kidneys out of stem cells to help track the early stages of polycystic kidney disease. Researchers created and grew mini-kidney organoids that have a realistic micro anatomy to study polycystic kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disease that causes cysts to grow in the kidneys. The cysts

NIH awards $15M for 3D human tissue models

The National Institutes of Health has announced 13 two-year awards, totaling $15 million a year, for hospitals and universities to develop 3D human tissue models. The funding will go toward the first phase of a five-year program. Even though pre-clinical studies using cell and animal research models are promising, more than 60% of investigational drugs

3D-printed organ developer BioLife4D seeks $50 million IPO

Biological 3D printing developer BioLife4D has filed for a $50 million initial public offering as it looks to commercialize its cardiac tissue regeneration and organ replacement processes. The Chicago-based company said yesterday it is developing technologies with an end goal of creating a 3D bioprinted viable human heart suitable for transplant. Funds from the offering

Is this the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves?

Nanofiber fabrication may be the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves with regenerative and growth potential, according to new research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. A research team led by Kevin Kit Parker created a valve-shaped nanofiber network that replicates the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).

This exoskeleton could eliminate crouch gait

The National Institutes of Health has created what it claims is the first robotic exoskeleton that is designed to treat crouch gait in children who have cerebral palsy. Crouch gait occurs when there is excessive bending of the knees while walking. It is a common condition in children with cerebral palsy. The NIH reports that

Cell stacking technology creates living human organs

Research engineers at Brown University have figured out a way to build tiny versions of human organs one micro-level at a time, and Igus technology helped enable the innovation. Using cells that are shaped as microscopic honeycomb-like patterns, Jeffrey Morgan, a professor at the university, created a method that consists of precisely stacking molded cells and

This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues

Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

Lab-engineered tissue is creating new digestive tract treatments

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have reported success with lab-engineered tissue replacements to treat digestive system diseases. The research team demonstrated the effectiveness of growing anal sphincters in a lab to treat an animal model for fecal incontinence. The success comes after the researchers reported success in implanting human-engineered intestines in rodents. “Results from both