This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

How electrical currents could monitor lung functions from an ICU bed

Electrical currents from an electrode-filled belt could soon help monitor important bodily functions like lung function, according to Austrian researchers. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a new imaging technique created by a collaboration between Technische Universität Wien, Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna. The electrode-filled belt is applied directly on

Apple to launch heart arrhythmia trial with Apple Watch 3

Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) said this week it will partner with telemedicine company American Well and Stanford University to test the performance of its Series 3 Apple Watch to detect heart arrhythmias, according to a Fortune report. The tech giant announced the Apple Heart Study at its iPhone unveiling event earlier this week, saying that the company would […]

Johns Hopkins researchers set medical drone delivery record

With a 3-hour, 161-mile flight across the Arizona desert, researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine completed a record-distance medical drone delivery. During the flight, the drone’s payload system maintained the temperature of the human blood samples stored in a temperature-controlled chamber onboard, keeping them viable for lab analysis, according to the findings…

NIH awards $15M for 3D human tissue models

The National Institutes of Health has announced 13 two-year awards, totaling $15 million a year, for hospitals and universities to develop 3D human tissue models. The funding will go toward the first phase of a five-year program. Even though pre-clinical studies using cell and animal research models are promising, more than 60% of investigational drugs

How squid ink could make going to the dentist painless

Squid ink could be used as a new imaging method at the dentist to check for gum disease, according to new research from the University of California at San Diego. Combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, engineers at UCSD have created a new dental imaging method that can painlessly and non-invasively examine a patient’s

Study: artificial ‘skin’ could improve robot sensing

Researchers have found a material that can mimic human skin and improve robots’ sensing capabilities. Usually rigid semiconductor materials that create robots’ circuits limit the machines’ movement or sensing, either because they are not flexible or don’t permit electrons to flow efficiently. But the rubber electronics and sensors tested by a University of Houston team…

This smart mat can predict the onset of foot ulcers

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology hackathon participant developed a smart mat that helps detect early warning signs of foot ulcers. Jon Bloom, co-founder of startup company Podimetrics, developed a mat that can detect foot ulcers before they happen and reduce the number of amputations occurring. Bloom completed his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in

IBM and MIT partner on AI research lab

IBM and the Mass. Institute of Technology plan to expand their ongoing partnership to create the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab to perform research on artificial intelligence. IBM is making a 10-year, $240 million investment to establish the Cambridge, Mass. center. The lab will harness the work of 100 scientists, professors and students to develop AI…

MIT researchers find way to automate measuring brain cell signals

Engineers at the Mass. Institute of Technology are working to automate the process of recording electrical signals from a brain neuron, which could help researchers more precisely study individual brain cells that affect learning and functioning and cause cognitive diseases. “Knowing how neurons communicate is fundamental to basic and clinical neuroscience,” Ed Boyden, senior author…

Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating

Is this the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves?

Nanofiber fabrication may be the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves with regenerative and growth potential, according to new research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. A research team led by Kevin Kit Parker created a valve-shaped nanofiber network that replicates the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).

This exoskeleton could eliminate crouch gait

The National Institutes of Health has created what it claims is the first robotic exoskeleton that is designed to treat crouch gait in children who have cerebral palsy. Crouch gait occurs when there is excessive bending of the knees while walking. It is a common condition in children with cerebral palsy. The NIH reports that

Cell stacking technology creates living human organs

Research engineers at Brown University have figured out a way to build tiny versions of human organs one micro-level at a time, and Igus technology helped enable the innovation. Using cells that are shaped as microscopic honeycomb-like patterns, Jeffrey Morgan, a professor at the university, created a method that consists of precisely stacking molded cells and

Cells can be programmed into living devices: Here’s how

Synthetic biologists at Harvard University have programmed microbial cells into living devices that can produce drugs, fine chemicals and biofuels and detect disease-causing agents. A team of biologists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering fit cells with artificial molecular machinery that could sense stimuli like toxins in the environment, metabolite levels and inflammatory