This microscopy technique could create better biopsies

Researchers are using high-resolution image biopsy samples to create more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Light microscopes are usually used for pathology, but fine details of cells can’t be seen with them. The new technique, developed by Harvard Medical School and MIT, relies on expansion microscopy which expands

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

This wearable measures your emotions

Forget the mood rings. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab’s spinout mPath has created a wearable device that can determine the exact moment a wearer is experiencing certain subconscious emotions. The MOXO wearable was originally developed to study the stress levels of children who have autism. That device, commercialized through MIT professor Rosalind Picard’s

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 14, 2017

From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief

Researchers develop metal-free contrast agent

Researchers at MIT and the University of Nebraska have developed a contrast agent that is metal-free, which could make it safer for certain individuals, according to a new report. The groups said they have created a metal-free contrast agent which could be safer for high-risk groups, as the fluid uses organic molecules called nitroxides, according

This wearable device predicts influenza outbreaks

A wearable thermometer developed by Boston Children’s Hospital has had success in predicting seasonal influenza outbreaks in China, one month earlier than before, according to a new study. “The fact that we were able to predict influenza outbreaks faster than China’s national surveillance programs really shows the capacity for everyday, wearable digital health devices to

Is this the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves?

Nanofiber fabrication may be the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves with regenerative and growth potential, according to new research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. A research team led by Kevin Kit Parker created a valve-shaped nanofiber network that replicates the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).

This snake-like robot could be used for colonoscopies

Ben-Gurion University researchers are working on creating an ingestible snake-like robot that can navigate through the small intestine for a robotic colonoscopy. The tiny, swallowable robot, deemed SAW (single actuator wave-like robot), moves in a wave motion and is able to move through the environment of the small intestine. “The external shape of the robot

Lamborghini is helping to create better prosthetics

Automobili Lamborghini is collaborating with Houston Methodist Research Institute to bring its carbon fiber composite material expertise to prosthetic implants. The research that Lamborghini will be joining is a biocompatibility study of the composite materials that are used in prosthetic implants and subcutaneous devices. The goal of the study is to be able to determine

New website brings biomedical engineering professionals together

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has launched a new website that is designed to bring the biomedical engineering community together and provide access to research and development advances. The Alliance of Advanced Biomedical Engineering (AABME) gathers technical articles, reports and other content about subjects including cell therapy, thermal medicine, medical devices, 3D printing

Cold, vibrating device works like lidocaine, but faster

A cold pack and a vibrating device reduces a child’s pain that comes with IV insertion during emergency room visits just as well as topical lidocaine but quicker, according to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers. The vibrating cold device can be used quickly, while lidocaine usually needs 30 minutes to take effect. It is battery-powered

Biocompatible 3D tracking could improve surgeries

Johns Hopkins University researchers recently wowed with their smart tissue, autonomous robot (STAR). It turns out the STAR’s biocompatible, near-infrared 3D tracking system is innovative, too. The tracking system – which uses near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) markers – could improve both manual and robot-assisted surgery and interventions, according to a new study. The study compared the 3D tracking

3D printed patch grows blood vessels

A newly developed 3D printed patch helps grow healthy blood vessels, according to a new study from Boston University. Professor Christopher Chen, director of the biological Design Center at Boston University, is in the process of developing 3D printed patches that are infused with cells to grow healthy blood vessels to treat ischemia. Ischemia is

Medtech stories we missed this week: July 7, 2017

From EnvisionTEC’s FDA approval to InVivo Therapeutics adding a new clinical site, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. EnvisionTEC wins FDA nod for 3D printing E-Denture material EnvisionTEC announced in a June 30 press release that it has received FDA approval for its E-Denture material

Home strep tests save time and money

Parents could save time and money by testing for strep throat at home as opposed to going to the doctor, according to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers also collaborated on the study. Streptococcus, also known as strep throat, causes a sore, red throat that is