Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

A $10 microchip helps create 3D ultrasound images: Here’s how

Researchers have used the same accelerometer technology that comes in a smartphone to give $50,000 ultrasound machines 3D imaging capabilities using a $10 microchip. A team of doctors and engineers at Duke University and Stanford University have used a fingernail-sized microchip that is mounted on a traditional ultrasound probe to relay 2D images of what

Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

This nerve-blocking treatment could treat asthma and heart failure

Electrical nerve-blocking implants could help treat asthma and heart failure, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University. Niloy Bhadra and Kevin Kilgore, professors of biomedical engineering and orthopedic surgery respectively, have been working on the nerve-blocking research since 2000. The research blocks unwanted generation of nerve impulses in a variety of clinical applications.

Webinar: Could this new software help you with clinical trials?

Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017 11:30 a.m. Eastern time / 8:30 a.m. Pacific time     Staicy is a next-generation health and research management platform which provides full transparency of your clinical data. Learn about integrating seamlessly your internal and external clinical applications and utilizing staicy’s proprietary functionality to uniquely select a geographical storage location for your

Patient with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Patients who have lost mobility in their legs due to complete spinal cord injury could soon regain lost motor function below the level of injury, thanks to new research out of the University of Louisville. Motor function was recovered after study participants received long-term activity-based training and spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). After approximately 34.5

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 27, 2017

From RadiaDyne’s FDA expansion to NuVasive launching its new implants, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA expands indications for RadiaDyne’s OARtrac dose monitor RadiaDyne announced in an Oct. 24 press release that it has received additional FDA clearance for its upcoming OARtrac. The OARtrac allows

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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This lab-on-a-chip is bringing point-of-care diagnostics to smartphones

A new diagnostic platform that works using a smartphone is making point-of-care diagnostics easier for infectious diseases. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma developed a device that diagnoses infectious diseases at the point-of-care. The devices uses a smartphone as the detection instrument with a test kit

Self-propelled catheter moves through bronchi like an earthworm

Japanese researchers have created a catheter that can navigate by itself through some of the thinnest branches of the bronchi. Pulmonary lesions are biopsied to diagnose or treat respiratory illnesses like lung cancer. Bronchoscopy is the standard method for manual biopsies. The bronchi branches into different directions and progressively gets thinner and more difficult to

This surgical glue seals wounds in 60 seconds

A potentially life-saving surgical glue that is highly elastic and adhesive can quickly seal wounds in seconds without the need for common staples or sutures. The surgical glue, called MeTro, is a development from biomedical engineers at the University of Sydney and biomedical engineers from Harvard University. MeTro has a high elasticity that can seal

Artificial intelligence could prevent breast cancer false positives: Here’s how

Artificial intelligence could improve detection and diagnosis of breast cancer and eliminate false positives, according to new research out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). A team of researchers from MIT’s CSAIL, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School developed an AI system with machine learning that can

Less than half of healthcare professionals think medtech brands meet needs

Roughly two-fifths of healthcare professionals say medical device brands aren’t meeting expectations, and failure to offer flexible contract options is also a problem, according to a new survey from Vennli (South Bend, Ind.). The survey, called “Differentiating to Win in Medical Device Marketing,” polled over 9,000 physicians, dentists and other clinicians to figure out what

How targeting a gene mutation could treat aggressive lung cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a gene mutation that could help treat an aggressive form of lung cancer that is known to be “undruggable.” Gene mutations in the KEAP1 gene could help treat mutations in the KRAS gene that causes certain lung cancer types to be undruggable. KEAP1 mutations occur with

Spinal cord stimulator could curb opioid prescriptions: Here’s how

The first implantation of Nuvectra’s Algovita Spinal Cord Stimulation System was recently performed in Northern California. The FDA-approved Algovita SCS System was able to successfully treat a injured veteran’s chronic pain to reduce the use of opioids to battle the pain. “Following injuries sustained in the line of duty, this particular patient had multiple surgeries