7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

How a common hospital tool predicts poor outcomes after liver transplants

A frequently used tool in the hospital can be an indicator of which liver transplant recipients will do poorly after surgery, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Led by Vinay Sundaram, a team of researchers found that the nursing assessment called the Braden Scale could be put to use in liver transplant patients

Lab-engineered tissue is creating new digestive tract treatments

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have reported success with lab-engineered tissue replacements to treat digestive system diseases. The research team demonstrated the effectiveness of growing anal sphincters in a lab to treat an animal model for fecal incontinence. The success comes after the researchers reported success in implanting human-engineered intestines in rodents. “Results from both

How new chemistry is making medical imaging better

Researchers recently stumbled upon a chemical mechanism that could be used to make radioactive tracers, according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The discovery resulted in an alternative way to create chemical compounds that are beneficial to noninvasive, high-resolution, 3D medical imaging technology like positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

This 3D printed implant replaces skull bone

A New Jersey doctor turned to Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Synthes and a 3D printed implant to replace missing skull bone in a patient. The procedure was performed after the patient suffered brain swelling and the skull became infected. Dr. Gaurav Gupta, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, had to

Bionik Labs integrates Amazon voice control tech into Arke lower body exoskeleton

Robotic rehabilitation device developer Bionik Laboratories said it integrated Amazon‘s (NSDQ:AMZN) Echo and Alexa voice technology into its Arke lower body exoskeleton. With the integration users of the Arke exoskeleton will be able to control the system and its various activity modes, including standing and walking, through voice commands, the Toronto-based company said. Read the whole story on

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

How WiFi could monitor sleep disorders

Monitoring sleep disorders could be as easy as measuring the radio waves around a patient through WiFi, according to new research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital. Traditionally, physicians measure sleep disorders through electrodes or other sensors attached to a patient. The new method, however, is a device that uses an advanced

This new nanochip technology can reprogram human cells

Ohio State University researchers have developed a nanochip technology that they say can create any cell type for treatment within the human body. The new technology, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), can repair injured tissue and restore the function of aging tissue like organs, blood vessels and nerve cells. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured

Electrical fields can heal brain damage: Here’s how

Electrical fields can guide neural stem cells into a specific location to repair brain damage, according to new research from the University of California at Davis. Min Zhao, a researcher at UC Davis, studies how electric fields can guide wound healing. His previous research has shown that electric fields are able to attract cells into

This new device could provide better cervical cancer screening

Histologics has developed a small, Velcro hook-like device that is better able to consistently obtain samples of cells in the cervix during colposcopies to diagnose cervical cancer, according to researchers from the University of California at Riverside. Women who have an abnormal pap smear results usually have to have a colposcopy to closely examine the

How slugs are creating better medical adhesives

Slug mucus is the inspiration behind a new adhesive to close surgical wounds and reduce the use of surgical staples, according to new research out of Harvard. Some of the current adhesives on the market can be toxic and stick together tissues weakly. Some can’t be used in wet environments altogether, which can pose a

3D printing is possible in water: why you should care

Can you 3D print in water? According to researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, you can. The Israeli researchers have developed a photoinitiator for 3D printing in water. 3D printing structures in water has always been challenging due to a lack of water soluble molecules known as photoinitiators —