This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

Study: artificial ‘skin’ could improve robot sensing

Researchers have found a material that can mimic human skin and improve robots’ sensing capabilities. Usually rigid semiconductor materials that create robots’ circuits limit the machines’ movement or sensing, either because they are not flexible or don’t permit electrons to flow efficiently. But the rubber electronics and sensors tested by a University of Houston team…

Wearable sensor developer MC10 raises $9.2m

MC10, a Lexington, Mass.–based wearable sensor developer, raised $9.2 million in an offering of promissory notes and warrants convertible into preferred stock to 18 investors, according to regulatory filing. The flexible electronics company still needs to raise $767,038 to reach the offering’s $10 million total. MC10’s BioStamp wearable sensors collect and transmit biometric data, allowing

4 questions to ask when the mold will not fill right

A pressure sensor can be a big help when your mold isn’t filling properly. Here are four questions to ask when shopping for the right sensor. Shane VandeKerkhof, RJG Some molding problems can be diagnosed with a little pressure data from inside the mold. But whether you’re new to molding or a seasoned veteran trying to

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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What Shark Week teaches us about health sensors and other medtech

I love Shark Week, the Discovery Channel’s annual mid-summer block of shark-related programming that just wrapped up. And now that my toddler is older, I finally have someone to watch it with me. Sharks Week also has an interesting relationship to the latest medical technologies. Ocean researchers and production engineers involved with Shark Week are pretty

Could this algorithm be better at diagnosing arrhythmia than cardiologists?

A new algorithm that can go through hours of heart data to detect arrhythmia performs better than trained cardiologists, according to new research from Stanford University. The algorithm gathers data from wearable monitors to find life-threatening irregular heartbeats and allows for data to be sorted through in remote areas where there is a scarcity of

Could this temperature sensor reduce power consumption in medical devices?

A new temperature sensor that runs at 113 pW could make wearables and even implantable medical devices less power dependent, according to research from the University of California at San Diego. The temperature sensor, developed by electrical engineers at UCSD, uses about 628 times lower power than state-of-the-art power sources and is 10 billion times

Worcester Polytechnic Institute launches smart medical devices program

Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has announced the launch of its new PracticePoint program that is designed to bring research, development and testing of medical devices under one roof. PracticePoint, with $17 million in initial funding, will focus on creating smart and secure medical devices that can interact with the physical world and improve patient-centric care.

This wearable measures your emotions

Forget the mood rings. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab’s spinout mPath has created a wearable device that can determine the exact moment a wearer is experiencing certain subconscious emotions. The MOXO wearable was originally developed to study the stress levels of children who have autism. That device, commercialized through MIT professor Rosalind Picard’s

6 surgical robots that will surprise you

Researchers around the globe have created surgical robots for solutions to procedures that are generally invasive and time-consuming. Whether its eye surgery or even finding a vein to draw blood, healthcare practitioners face daunting tasks, but robots have made these procedures easier (as easy as the DaVinci makes it look when peeling a grape and

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Researchers claim 100% cancer detection rate

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center say they have developed a multimodal optical spectroscopy probe that could provide better detection of common forms of cancer, enabling longer life expectancies and lower risk of recurrence. The team, which began work on the probe in 2015, have refined the invention and designed a new

How sweat could evaluate resident physician surgical skills

The amount of sweat produced during a procedure could be an evaluation tool of the surgical skills of resident physicians, according to new research from the University of Missouri School of Medicine. Postgraduate physician training is a time for physicians to develop skills and expertise within the medical specialty of their choosing. While training, medical

Reducing production waste with laser profiling and characterization

Mark Szorik, MKS Instruments As a general rule, most industries preparing a production line run a few sacrificial products, and then, if all checks out, begin running production. This is all well and good until the unexpected hits product quality or volume – or both. When something malfunctions on a modern, precision, high-speed process, it can