Electronic ‘hairy skin’ could give robots a more human sense of touch

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces Electronic-skin prototypes are stretchy, thin films that can sense temperature, pressure and even monitor blood oxygen or alcohol levels. But most of these devices are missing a key feature of real skin that allows us to feel a wider range of conditions: hair. Now researchers have combined hair-like wires with

Implantable “artificial pancreas” could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar

Editor’s Note: This article and information is credited to American Chemical Society (ACS). Constant glucose monitoring and frequent insulin injections could someday be replaced with an “artificial pancreas” for people with Type 1 diabetes. Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the

A portable “paper machine” can diagnose disease for less than $2

Editor’s Note: This article and information is credited to the American Chemical Society (ACS). A “paper machine” about 10 inches in length could bring modern diagnostics to remote places. In the U.S. and other industrialized nations, testing for infectious diseases and cancer often requires expensive equipment and highly trained specialists. In countries where resources are limited, performing the

Should scientists be allowed to genetically alter human embryos?

Scientists have at their disposal, a way to explore the possible prevention of genetic diseases before birth. But should they? Currently, the most promising path forward involves editing the genes of human embryos, a procedure threaded with controversy. An article in “Chemical & Engineering News” (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), parses

Tackling chronic sinusitis by addressing underlying factors

The stuffy noses and sinus pressure of head colds are uncomfortable, but for most people, they go away within days. For those with chronic sinusitis, however, those symptoms and others drag on for weeks. Now scientists are onto a potential new therapy that could address one of the underlying factors associated with the condition. They

Implantable “artificial pancreas” could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the American Chemical Society (ACS) journal, “Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research,” the development of an implantable “artificial pancreas” that continuously measures a person’s blood sugar or glucose level and can automatically release insulin as