This smart mat can predict the onset of foot ulcers

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology hackathon participant developed a smart mat that helps detect early warning signs of foot ulcers. Jon Bloom, co-founder of startup company Podimetrics, developed a mat that can detect foot ulcers before they happen and reduce the number of amputations occurring. Bloom completed his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in

IBM and MIT partner on AI research lab

IBM and the Mass. Institute of Technology plan to expand their ongoing partnership to create the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab to perform research on artificial intelligence. IBM is making a 10-year, $240 million investment to establish the Cambridge, Mass. center. The lab will harness the work of 100 scientists, professors and students to develop AI…

MIT researchers find way to automate measuring brain cell signals

Engineers at the Mass. Institute of Technology are working to automate the process of recording electrical signals from a brain neuron, which could help researchers more precisely study individual brain cells that affect learning and functioning and cause cognitive diseases. “Knowing how neurons communicate is fundamental to basic and clinical neuroscience,” Ed Boyden, senior author…

Non-invasive cell probing offers new insight into disease progression

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have figured out a way to assess the mechanical properties of a cell using simple observation. Usually, cells have to be probed with expensive instruments like atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers to determine the mechanical properties of a cell. Those methods make direct and invasive contact with the cells. The

7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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How WiFi could monitor sleep disorders

Monitoring sleep disorders could be as easy as measuring the radio waves around a patient through WiFi, according to new research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital. Traditionally, physicians measure sleep disorders through electrodes or other sensors attached to a patient. The new method, however, is a device that uses an advanced

7 ways neurostimulation could make our lives better

Neurostimulation is being used for a lot of different things that go beyond motor disorders and diseases. Neurostimulation is used to stimulate certain parts of the brain’s nervous system. It can be invasive with implants or it can be non-invasive with electrode-filled caps and ear clips. The neurostimulation market was worth an estimated $1.9 billion

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This microscopy technique could create better biopsies

Researchers are using high-resolution image biopsy samples to create more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Light microscopes are usually used for pathology, but fine details of cells can’t be seen with them. The new technique, developed by Harvard Medical School and MIT, relies on expansion microscopy which expands

Brain implants last longer if they’re smaller: Here’s how

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have recently suggested that if electrodes implanted in the brain were smaller, the devices could last much longer. Diseases like Parkinson’s disease can be treated with electrical stimulations from electrodes that have been implanted in the brain. Implanted electrodes, however, can cause scarring which can make the electrodes less effective

This wearable measures your emotions

Forget the mood rings. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab’s spinout mPath has created a wearable device that can determine the exact moment a wearer is experiencing certain subconscious emotions. The MOXO wearable was originally developed to study the stress levels of children who have autism. That device, commercialized through MIT professor Rosalind Picard’s

Researchers develop metal-free contrast agent

Researchers at MIT and the University of Nebraska have developed a contrast agent that is metal-free, which could make it safer for certain individuals, according to a new report. The groups said they have created a metal-free contrast agent which could be safer for high-risk groups, as the fluid uses organic molecules called nitroxides, according

Home strep tests save time and money

Parents could save time and money by testing for strep throat at home as opposed to going to the doctor, according to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers also collaborated on the study. Streptococcus, also known as strep throat, causes a sore, red throat that is

New non-invasive brain stimulation method could treat autism and more

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have figured out how to non-invasively deliver electrical stimulation to specific parts of the brain. In collaboration with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the IT’IS Foundation, the MIT researchers have placed electrodes on the scalps of patients to stimulate regions that are deep in the brain, making a

New surgical technique makes prosthetic limbs feel real

MIT researchers have developed a new surgical technique that makes prosthetic limbs feel like real limbs. It could also help reduce the rejection rate of prosthetic limbs. “We’re talking about a dramatic improvement in patient care,” said Hugh Herr, a professor of media arts and sciences and senior author on the study, in a press

Could wireless signals help diagnose diseases?

Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has developed a wireless device that is the size of a small painting and could help diagnose cognitive decline and cardiac disease – all through wireless signals. The device, deemed WiGait, measures the walking speed of people with 95 to 99% accuracy using wireless