Victrex announces new CEO

Victrex announced that it has appointed Jakob Sigurdsson as CEO-designate; he will gain the full title of CEO on Oct. 1. He is preceded by Dave Hummel who is retiring after 24 years as CEO. Victrex makes high-performance polyaryletherketone (PAEK) as well as selected parts for gears and dental discs. It hopes to execute growth

Is this the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves?

Nanofiber fabrication may be the key to rapidly manufacturing heart valves with regenerative and growth potential, according to new research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. A research team led by Kevin Kit Parker created a valve-shaped nanofiber network that replicates the mechanical and chemical properties of the native valve extracellular matrix (ECM).

NuVasive wins FDA nod for redesigned Magec system

NuVasive Inc. (NSDQ:NUVA) said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its redesigned Magec magnetically controlled growth modulation system. The San Diego, Calif.-based company’s Magec system uses magnetic technology and adjustable growth rods to treat early-onset scoliosis, and features the company’s Reline small stature system. The Reline small stature platform is a pediatric deformity fixation system which […]

PeekMed receives CE Mark and ISO certification

PeekMed (Braga, Portugal) recently announced that it has received ISO 13485 certification and CE Mark for its flagship 3D pre-operative system for orthopedic surgeons. The new CE Mark allows PeekMed to sell its system in Europe. It is currently working on obtaining FDA 510(k) approval to market in the U.S. PeekMed helps orthopedic surgeons plan

This exoskeleton could eliminate crouch gait

The National Institutes of Health has created what it claims is the first robotic exoskeleton that is designed to treat crouch gait in children who have cerebral palsy. Crouch gait occurs when there is excessive bending of the knees while walking. It is a common condition in children with cerebral palsy. The NIH reports that

Cell stacking technology creates living human organs

Research engineers at Brown University have figured out a way to build tiny versions of human organs one micro-level at a time, and Igus technology helped enable the innovation. Using cells that are shaped as microscopic honeycomb-like patterns, Jeffrey Morgan, a professor at the university, created a method that consists of precisely stacking molded cells and

CSP Technologies expands Alabama facility

CSP Technologies is expanding its Auburn, Ala. manufacturing and warehousing capacity by 110,000 sq. ft. The expansion has already begun and is under construction. The company said in a recent news release that it is expanding its facility because of the growing needs of the healthcare and food safety industries. The expansion follows a thermoforming line

Cells can be programmed into living devices: Here’s how

Synthetic biologists at Harvard University have programmed microbial cells into living devices that can produce drugs, fine chemicals and biofuels and detect disease-causing agents. A team of biologists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering fit cells with artificial molecular machinery that could sense stimuli like toxins in the environment, metabolite levels and inflammatory

How augmented reality could guide facial reconstruction surgeries

A Japanese research team has created an augmented reality (AR) system that allows them to create 3D simulations of facial reconstructive procedure results, projecting the images over a patient’s face during surgery. Researchers at Osaka Medical College in Japan reported that they have developed and tested the AR system for evaluating improvements of the body

Resonetics acquires Aduro Laser

Resonetics announced that it has acquired Aduro Laser. The financial details of the deal were not disclosed. “We are very excited to partner with Grayson Beck and Demian Backs, who have created raving fans with Aduro’s disruptive business model,” Tom Burns, Resonetics’ CEO, said. “We share a similar culture with an emphasis on innovation, speed

Brooks Stevens announces new president

Brooks Stevens (Milwaukee, Wis.) recently announced that it has named Mike Roberts as its new president, effective immediately. Roberts has over 30 years of product development and design automation experience. He will now be responsible for Brooks Stevens’ transformation into a stronger and technology-driven product design and development company. Roberts will also be responsible for

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 25, 2017

From InspireMD’s Swiss distribution deal to CoreLink’s stackable guide wire launch, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD announces Swiss distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Aug. 25 press release that it has signed an agreement with 1a Medical to distribute the CGuard EPS (Embolic

This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues

Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and

BMZ Group opening new center to develop batteries

BMZ Group will open its E.Volution Center next month in Aschaffenburg, Germany. The addition will include 150 developers focused on creating the energy storage systems of the future. Under chief technical officer Dirk Oestreich’s leadership, the company plans to develop 200 new battery systems that can be used in medical products, cars, bicycles and more.

Soft, water-powered robot makes endoscopic surgery easier

Harvard researchers have created a rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes that can sense, flex and has multiple degrees of freedom. Flexible endoscopes fit through narrow passages to reach difficult parts of the body. Once they reach their target, the devices need rigid surgical tools to be able to manipulate or remove tissues. Researchers from Harvard’s