A $10 microchip helps create 3D ultrasound images: Here’s how

Researchers have used the same accelerometer technology that comes in a smartphone to give $50,000 ultrasound machines 3D imaging capabilities using a $10 microchip. A team of doctors and engineers at Duke University and Stanford University have used a fingernail-sized microchip that is mounted on a traditional ultrasound probe to relay 2D images of what

Apple to launch heart arrhythmia trial with Apple Watch 3

Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) said this week it will partner with telemedicine company American Well and Stanford University to test the performance of its Series 3 Apple Watch to detect heart arrhythmias, according to a Fortune report. The tech giant announced the Apple Heart Study at its iPhone unveiling event earlier this week, saying that the company would […]

7 diagnostic devices to boost healthcare in the developing world

The World Health Organization estimates that a quarter of death and disease globally is caused by hazards and environmental burdens in developing countries with little to no access to preventative care and diagnostic devices. Since developing countries are poor agricultural regions that are still becoming economically and socially advanced, it is harder for doctors to

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Could this algorithm be better at diagnosing arrhythmia than cardiologists?

A new algorithm that can go through hours of heart data to detect arrhythmia performs better than trained cardiologists, according to new research from Stanford University. The algorithm gathers data from wearable monitors to find life-threatening irregular heartbeats and allows for data to be sorted through in remote areas where there is a scarcity of

Cardiology research breakthroughs you need to know

Recent months have seen a host of important cardiology research breakthroughs related to new cardio devices and diagnostics, tissue engineering and the overall understanding of heart disease and its treatment. For example,  a customizable robotic heart sleeve – developed at Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital – has demonstrated advantages over other heart assist devices

Fitness trackers versus medical devices: What’s the difference?

Recent research studies have been calling into question the accuracy of fitness trackers. So when would FDA step in and regulate them as medical devices? It all comes down to the difference between low-risk general wellness devices and medical devices – a distinction covered in an FDA guidance document last year, said Michael Drues, a Boston-based

Your fitness tracker could be misleading you

Your heart rate may be accurate on your fitness tracker, but the number of calories burned is significantly wrong, according to new research from Stanford University. Apple Watch, Basis Peak, Fitbit Surge, Microsoft Band, Mio Alpha 2, PulseOn and Samsung Gear S2 were tested in a group of 60 people. The results showed that measuring

Your brain doesn’t navigate like a GPS after all

Neurons were once considered the brain’s GPS, and they were subject of a Nobel Prize in 2014 that outlined the discovery of grid cells and specialized neurons that help animals keep track of their location in environments. New Stanford University research suggests that the brain and neurons just might be more complex than that. Lisa

9 cardiology breakthroughs you need to know

Cardiology breakthroughs couldn’t come soon enough because heart disease is the No. 1 killer of men and women in the U.S. About 610,000 Americans die of heart disease per year, and an additional 735,000 Americans suffer from a heart attack. The statistics terrify. High blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking are some of the top

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These nanostraws can sample cells without damaging them

Stanford University researchers say they’ve developed nanostraws capable of sampling cell contents—all without disrupting natural processes. The innovation has the potential to provide non-destructive cell monitoring versus lysing, the cell sampling method presently used. Lysing ruptures the cell, while the sampling method developed at Stanford relies on tiny tubes that are 600 times smaller than

Turns out unneeded ICD shocks have costs

A Stanford University School of Medicine–led team of researchers has discovered that implantable cardioverter defibrillators that administer shocks unnecessarily could actually do more harm than good. Those who have had a ventricular arrhythmia, heart attack, survived sudden cardiac arrest and have a congenital heart disease typically have an ICD implanted, according to the American Heart

This AI can spot skin cancer as well as doctors

Stanford University researchers say that they’ve trained a deep learning algorithm to identify skin cancer as well as dermatologists. The researchers pitted the artificial intelligence against 21 board-certified dermatologists when it came to diagnosing skin lesions. The deep convolutional neural network’s performance was on par with the experts when it came to spotting the most