This nanofiber device can hear cells moving

A new miniature nanofiber device created by engineers at the University of California at San Diego is sensitive enough that it can feel bacteria swimming and can hear heart muscle cells beating. The device is 100 times thinner than a human hair and is made of optical fiber. It is designed to be able to detect forces

Gut microbiomes can predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

There is a microbe in stool samples that can predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. NAFLD occurs when there is a build up extra fat in liver cells that isn’t caused by alcohol, according to the American Liver Foundation. The liver has

Engineered tissue could eliminate radiation for bone marrow transplants

University of California San Diego engineers have created artificial bone tissue that could eliminate the need for radiation before bone marrow transplants. Shyni Varghese, a bioengineering professor at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led a team to develop a bone-like implant to eliminate the pre-treatment radiation that kills stem cells in a patient’s bone

12 interesting wearables you should know

Wearable technology is probably one of those things you probably didn’t need but still wanted because people were always talking about the devices. Fitbit, Apple and Garmin are some of the main providers of health and wellness wearables. Each of them touts being able to track your fitness activity or measures your heart rate. However, consumer

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6 visual impairment breakthroughs you need to know

About 285 million people have some form of visual impairment in the world, according to the World Health Organization. Of that number, 39 million are considered blind, and 246 million have low vision. Three-fifths of all vision impairment can be prevented or cured. Uncorrected refractive errors are one of the main causes of vision impairment in

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Nanoengineers 3D-print biomimetic blood vessel networks

University of California San Diego researchers have 3D-printed a functional blood vessel network that they believe could someday be used in artificial organs and regenerative medicines. The team’s work was published in Biomaterials. Previous work in the field has yielded simple and costly structures, the researchers said, that are not capable of integrating with the body’s own