Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

4 ways wearables will transform healthcare’s future

Wearable technology is moving beyond consumer-grade health and wellness devices – the daily step counters and heart rate trackers offered by the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. “They’re convenient, small, portable and inexpensive, but you don’t use consumer items for life and death,” said Dr. Arthur Combs, chief medical officer at flexible electronics company MC10

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9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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3D printing could make bionic skin possible: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers 3D printed tiny stretchable electronic sensory devices that could enable bionic skin for surgical robots – or a new class of wearables directly printed onto human skin. Their work appeared May 5 in the journal Advanced Materials. “This stretchable electronic fabric we developed has many practical uses,” said Michael McAlpine, a

Apple Watch detects atrial fibrillation using built-in technology

The Apple Watch can automatically detect atrial fibrillation (AF) using its built-in heart rate sensor and artificial intelligence, according to a new study. The research used a deep neural network that was based on photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensors that are frequently found in smart watches. When paired with an artificial intelligence-based algorithm, Apple Watch’s heart rate

7 wearable medtech companies from the Wearable Technology Show

Updated March 10, 2017 Wearable devices aren’t going anywhere anytime soon in the world of medtech. The Wearable Technology Show 2017 took place March 7 and March 8 at the ExCel in London, offering a chance to check out some of the latest wearable devices. Digital health technology, smart textiles and sensors, and augmented reality

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‘Electronic tattoos’: Could they be the future of wearables?

Japanese researchers have pushed the boundaries even further when it comes to flexible electronics for wearable medical devices. They say they used a household inkjet printer without soldering to produce 750 nm–thin elastomeric sheets that feel like “electronic tattoos.” The result of the Waseda University researchers’ work was ultrathin stick-on electronic devices using elastomeric “nanosheet” film.

Kyocera touts tiny blood-flow sensor for wearable devices

Kyocera says it has developed one the world’s smallest optical blood-flow sensors for use in wearable devices and mobile health (mHealth) applications. Kyocera’s sensor is 1mm high, 1.6mm long and 3.2mm wide and can be used in cellphones and wearable devices. Any devices that are equipped with Kyocera’s blood-flow sensor will measure blood-flow volume just