Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

Philips unveils new image-guided therapies and diagnostic devices

Philips is showcasing some of its recently expanded image-guided therapies at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) event in Denver this year. The company is touting its advanced interventional imaging systems, diagnostic and therapeutic devices, planning and navigation software and various services. It is also showcasing its latest cardiac care solutions for ultrasound and image-guided

These 7 antique medical devices will make you shudder

It’s a good thing we live in the times of modern medicine. Historically, medical devices have been scary and unorthodox – and sometimes amounted to downright quackery. Surprisingly, a lot of these devices were thought to be useful in their era, long before the U.S. FDA started preapproving devices (which wasn’t until the 1970s). You

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Patient with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Patients who have lost mobility in their legs due to complete spinal cord injury could soon regain lost motor function below the level of injury, thanks to new research out of the University of Louisville. Motor function was recovered after study participants received long-term activity-based training and spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). After approximately 34.5

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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7 breast cancer breakthroughs you need to know

As we mark another Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s worth noting the recent strides that have been made when it comes to diagnosing and treating the disease. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women in the U.S. Affecting one in eight women, breast cancer will be accountable for about 40,610 deaths

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Wearable device gives real-time posture feedback to Parkinson’s patients

University of Houston researchers have developed a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system – a wearable device designed to help people with Parkinson’s disease. The research team developed the Smarter Balance System (SBS) to help guide patients through balance exercises while using wearable technology. It is designed to help people regain stable balance and confidence in doing

Theraclion touts Echopulse thyroid nodule treatment results

Theraclion says its Echopulse has shown improved outcomes when treating thyroid nodules when compared to surgical treatment, according to new published data. Three studies – led byDr. Brian Hung-Hin Lang, chief of the endocrine surgery division at Queen Mary University Hospital in Hong Kong – showed the efficiency of using the Echopulse for non-invasive treatment

6 brain-controlled devices helping people regain movement

People who have lost feeling in their limbs or have lost the ability to move them may soon have those sensations restored thanks to a slew of recent brain-controlled device innovations. While we are moving toward less invasive methods such as electrode-filled caps on the head, there are still more invasive implants that are benefiting

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10 new crowdfunded health devices that will intrigue you

With crowdfunding websites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, companies can obtain the funding for ideas they want to come to life (even potato salad parties), with the promise of something in return to the donors. And while crowdfunding presents challenges for regulated medical devices, it’s proven to be a boon for startups touting potentially innovative health and

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Stuffed animal has lifelike heartbeat to aid Alzheimer’s patients

A couple of University of Illinois students have created a startup called Therapalz to give soothing vibrations, sounds, movement and a lifelike heartbeat within a stuffed animal for Alzheimer’s patients. The 2 students, junior systems engineering and design major Fiona Kalensky and junior marketing major Isak Massman, designed the companion animal for a student organization Design

Minimally-invasive migraine treatment for adults works on kids, too

Migraine treatment that has been safe for adults has recently proven to be safe for use in children as well. The minimally-invasive treatment only takes a few minutes for children and teenagers to be able to feel the effects. The treatment involves a sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) block that does not need needles. It uses a

Philips has a value argument for new image guided therapy platform

Royal Philips has announced the launch of its next generation image-guided therapy platform, deemed Azurion. Philips designed the platform to allow clinicians to easily perform a variety of routine and complex procedures. Meant for use in interventional labs, Azurion is but another example of medical device products with a strong value-based sales pitch around controlling costs

New study to evaluate virtual rehabilitation platform for physical therapy after total knee replacement surgery

Reflexion Health, a digital healthcare company, in conjunction with the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) announced the enrollment of the first patients in Virtual Exercise Rehabilitation In-home Therapy: A Research Study (VERITAS), which is designed to evaluate the cost and outcomes of using a virtual rehabilitation platform to deliver physical therapy following total knee replacement

ZDi Solutions receives FDA approval for patented proton therapy and conventional radiation therapy positioning devices

ZDi Solutions announced that it has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Z-System patient positioning devices for proton therapy and conventional radiation therapy. The company announced in late September that it has begun marketing both in the U.S. and internationally. The system is comprised of the Z-Box, Z-Square and Z-Tilt.