Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

Who got picked for FDA’s digital health pre-cert pilot?

FDA has announced the names of the companies selected to participate in its digital health pre-cert pilot – a first-of-its-kind program aimed to revolutionize digital health regulation in the U.S. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, FDA’s commissioner, announced the nine participants of FDA’s digital health software precertification pilot program (FDA Pre-cert) last week during his keynote address at the

Why Flex is betting on stretchtronics for medtech

The wearable lab at Flex (formerly Flextronics) reports it’s making strides when it comes to creating devices that are transparent and seamless. “Usually when you think about healthcare, you picture a person in a bed with wires running all around. We think healthcare should be as easy as putting on a T-shirt,” said John Carlson, president

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

This exoskeleton could eliminate crouch gait

The National Institutes of Health has created what it claims is the first robotic exoskeleton that is designed to treat crouch gait in children who have cerebral palsy. Crouch gait occurs when there is excessive bending of the knees while walking. It is a common condition in children with cerebral palsy. The NIH reports that

Wearable sensor developer MC10 raises $9.2m

MC10, a Lexington, Mass.–based wearable sensor developer, raised $9.2 million in an offering of promissory notes and warrants convertible into preferred stock to 18 investors, according to regulatory filing. The flexible electronics company still needs to raise $767,038 to reach the offering’s $10 million total. MC10’s BioStamp wearable sensors collect and transmit biometric data, allowing

4 ways wearables will transform healthcare’s future

Wearable technology is moving beyond consumer-grade health and wellness devices – the daily step counters and heart rate trackers offered by the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. “They’re convenient, small, portable and inexpensive, but you don’t use consumer items for life and death,” said Dr. Arthur Combs, chief medical officer at flexible electronics company MC10

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Is there a digital health solution for treating pain?

Could TENS devices be a potential answer to the opioid crisis? If they are, it’ll be thanks to digital health. Case in point is NeuroMetrix’s Quell device. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) gizmos have been around for decades. But they’ve had a reputation for being unwieldy, with a bunch of wires and pads. “TENS devices have been around

How Consensus Orthopedics added smarts to orthopedic devices

Consensus Orthopedics made headlines with its TracPatch this year. So how did an ortho company get a digital product to market? Let’s face it, orthopedic devices are dumb. That is to say, they are mute. Silent. And in today’s healthcare environment, the silent kind of dumb is dangerous. Consensus Orthopedics (El Dorado Hills, Calif.) wanted to

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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What Shark Week teaches us about health sensors and other medtech

I love Shark Week, the Discovery Channel’s annual mid-summer block of shark-related programming that just wrapped up. And now that my toddler is older, I finally have someone to watch it with me. Sharks Week also has an interesting relationship to the latest medical technologies. Ocean researchers and production engineers involved with Shark Week are pretty

Could this algorithm be better at diagnosing arrhythmia than cardiologists?

A new algorithm that can go through hours of heart data to detect arrhythmia performs better than trained cardiologists, according to new research from Stanford University. The algorithm gathers data from wearable monitors to find life-threatening irregular heartbeats and allows for data to be sorted through in remote areas where there is a scarcity of

Wearable device gives real-time posture feedback to Parkinson’s patients

University of Houston researchers have developed a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system – a wearable device designed to help people with Parkinson’s disease. The research team developed the Smarter Balance System (SBS) to help guide patients through balance exercises while using wearable technology. It is designed to help people regain stable balance and confidence in doing