Medical devices: When should you make them smarter?

The drive toward value in healthcare has increased demand for smarter medical devices able to provide information for real-time feedback, as well as after-the-fact analysis. So when does it make sense to actually make a medical device smarter? And how do you go about it? Tom KraMer, CEO of Kablooe Design outside Minneapolis, has a

Medtech companies need to expand their philosophy: Here’s why

Medtech companies should expand their notion of who their customers are and dig deeper to discern what those customers want, according to health provider- and insurer-connected experts at the recent DeviceTalks Minnesota in St. Paul. Artificial intelligence and the proliferation of healthcare data have made it possible for medtech to consider not just individual patients

Softwheels, Igus redefine the wheel in wheelchair

Thomas Renner, Catalyst Marketing Communications When engineers at SoftWheel set about re-inventing the wheel, the team at the Israel-based company studied their product from the inside out. The result is a much smoother ride for wheelchair patients, with applications for bicycles, automobiles and even planes on the long-term horizon. The technology behind SoftWheels for wheelchair patients

Common Sensing, Flex partner to redesign digital insulin pen sensor

Common Sensing said today that it has enlisted design company Flex to help redesign its Gocap insulin pen device. Flex is tasked with finding materials to help extend the product’s battery life, as well as boost measurement accuracy and prepare for high volume manufacturing. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News.

Nortech Systems expands China manufacturing facility

Nortech Systems recently announced that it is expanding its Suzhou, China manufacturing space. The new manufacturing space will be 15,000 sq. ft bigger than it currently is and will still offer Nortech Systems’s full-service electrical manufacturing services. This expansion comes after the Maple Grove, Minn.-based company expanded its Mexico operations in February by building a new

Will FDA turn to neuroscience-based human factors research?

There is a new wind blowing in medical technology — one that many believe is overdue: an overhaul of human factors. At the recent Patient Safety Initiative, Charles Murphy, Chief Patient Safety Officer at the Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, called out human factors as one of the key factors he believed needed to be

Webinar: How to balance regulations and performance with your medical device design

This webinar was presented live on Wednesday, June 20, 2018. Click below to watch on demand.     Creating a medical device that meets both regulatory compliance and performance requirements takes careful planning. You also need to understand the most efficient path to market commercialization in order to stay within budget and on schedule. This

Greenlight Guru’s newest software version enhances QMS, complex design tracking

Greenlight Guru — which offers cloud-based quality management software specifically for medical device companies — recently announced Multi-Level Design Control, the latest version of its purpose-built medical device design traceability software. The new platform improves on Indianapolis-based Greenlight Guru’s previous offering that moved design controls off the paper and into the cloud, said Greenlight Guru co-founder

7 ways you can doom your medical device startup

Randy Nelson has worked with medical device startups for more than a dozen years through his Evergreen Medical Technologies (St. Paul, Minn.), as well as the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. A product development veteran of St. Jude Medical and Boston Scientific, Nelson has pretty much seen it all when it comes to

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Drug delivery needs better human factors

Adopting neuroscience-based human factors methods could yield better outcomes for patients, improved communication design and engineering teams, and maybe even help companies build IP. The methods behind assessing human factors in medtech are outdated—and they’re due for an upgrade, said Charles Mauro CHFP, of Mauro Usability Science. “The type of research employed to determine if

This new PTFE seal could make insulin pumps and other medical devices better

In dynamic applications requiring sealing at low-to-moderate speeds and pressures, design engineers are replacing underperforming elastomeric O-rings with spring-energized PTFE “C-ring” seals. David Wang, Bal Seal Engineering When O-rings and other traditional sealing methods fail, diagnostic and drug-delivery equipment engineers are embracing a new and more cost-effective way to improve the performance of their existing

Webinar: Why minimum viable products are the ‘engineer’s curse’

This webinar was presented live on Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Click below to watch on demand.     As a startup, there are difficult decisions to be made related to product features and performance. We will examine methods and strategies to determine what performance and user specifications need to be met when launching your first

Medical device startups: Here’s how you handle verification and validation

The two “Vs” — also known as V&V, verification and validation — serve to link the medical device product that has been developed all the way back to the initial customer needs and product requirements. Bill Betten, Betten Systems Solutions While many think that verification and validation only occur at the end of the medical device development

These students redesigned scalpel packaging to prevent injuries

A group of Georgia Tech biomedical engineering students has created a new scalpel blade packaging that is designed to protect healthcare workers from injuries when handling scalpel blades. The invention is now a finalist in Georgia Tech’s annual innovation competition, Inventure Prize. The four students were tasked with redesigning a medical device and redesigned the

This new technology could help surgeons clear out leftover cancer cells

In some instances, as many as 30% of patients need repeat surgeries to get rid of cancerous cells initially left behind. The team from Lumicell wants to change that — and improve outcomes for cancer patients. After his wife died of breast cancer in 2003, David Lee stepped away from a decades-long career in the semiconductor