A day in the life of a medical packaging lab technician

Sarah Rosenblum, Packaging Compliance Labs Welcome to the life of a PCL lab technician! Every day is a new exciting challenge with new types of testing, engineering design verification and client interactions. You name it, we can help test it.  All mornings begin with the production meeting: We recap what’s happened the previous day, formulate

River blindness successfully treated using smartphone-based microscope

A California research team has developed a smartphone-based microscope technology that can help diagnose and treat river blindness. River blindness is a disease that is caused by parasitic worms. The END Fund reports that about 37 million people had the disease in 2010 with more than 102 million people being at risk in Africa alone.

How hydrogels could repair intestinal injuries

Hydrogels have already shown promise creating soft robotics and regrowing skull bones. New research suggests the water-based material could also help deliver stem cell treatment to repair damages caused by gastrointestinal diseases. Hydrogels have been permeating medtech recently – with researcheres using them for tasks as varied as gluing detached retinas back together to stopping bleeding. Now,

Sterigenics parent company is now Sotera Health

Sterigenics International said today that it has changed the name of its parent company to Sotera Health, with Nelson Labs, Nordion and Sterigenics as Sotera’s three operating companies. The new name drew its inspiration from the name of the Greek goddess of safety, Soteria, and is meant to reflect the company’s commitment to global health.

Nelson Labs parent Sterigenics buys Toxikon’s European lab business

Sterigentics International is seeking to turn its Nelson Labs business into a global extractables and leachables lab testing platform through its acquisition of Toxikon’s European division. The purchase of Toxikon Europe, announced yesterday, represents a capabilities expansion when it comes to serving the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. Sterigenics’s Nelson Labs business will now offer Toxikon

Artificial intelligence could prevent breast cancer false positives: Here’s how

Artificial intelligence could improve detection and diagnosis of breast cancer and eliminate false positives, according to new research out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). A team of researchers from MIT’s CSAIL, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School developed an AI system with machine learning that can

Mini lab-made kidneys help track polycystic kidney disease

University of Washington researchers created mini kidneys out of stem cells to help track the early stages of polycystic kidney disease. Researchers created and grew mini-kidney organoids that have a realistic micro anatomy to study polycystic kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disease that causes cysts to grow in the kidneys. The cysts

NIH awards $15M for 3D human tissue models

The National Institutes of Health has announced 13 two-year awards, totaling $15 million a year, for hospitals and universities to develop 3D human tissue models. The funding will go toward the first phase of a five-year program. Even though pre-clinical studies using cell and animal research models are promising, more than 60% of investigational drugs

Cell stacking technology creates living human organs

Research engineers at Brown University have figured out a way to build tiny versions of human organs one micro-level at a time, and Igus technology helped enable the innovation. Using cells that are shaped as microscopic honeycomb-like patterns, Jeffrey Morgan, a professor at the university, created a method that consists of precisely stacking molded cells and

How plasma treatments are driving up the value of plastic labware

By altering the surface properties of polymer labware through plasma treatments and coatings, manufacturers are improving the quality of test results while increasing value of products they create. Jeff Elliott, for PVA TePla America Each year, billions of multi-well plates, pipettes, bottles, flasks, vials, Eppendorf tubes, culture plates and other polymer labware items are manufactured for

LabConnect receives $24.5M in Series A funding

LabConnect announced that it has received a $24.5M Series A investment from ABS Capital Partners, Pablo Capital and BroadOak Capital. The funding will go toward growth initiatives like building out the technology platform, product and service enhancements and sales team expansions while also giving liquidity to early shareholders. John Stobo, a managing general partner at

This 3D heart tissue beats—and is made from multiple cardiac cell types

Scientists at Toronto’s York University have created 3D heart tissue that has a synchronized beat. They think the tissue could improve understanding of cardiac health as researchers develop new treatments. Muhammad Yousaf, a York University chemistry professor, and his graduate student team stuck three types of cardiac cells together to get a 3D heart tissue

Genetically engineered T-cells treat leukemia in babies

Researchers in London have successfully treated leukemia in two babies, in what they are touting as the world’s first treatment of cancer using genetically engineered immune cells from donors. Doctors treated two British infants, 11 and 16 months old, using Cellectis’s CAR T-cell product, UCART19, which is an allogeneic CAR T-cell product candidate for the

Centrifuge replacement is toy-inspired—and costs less than 25 cents

A centrifuge can cost hundreds of dollars, weigh several pounds and consume lots of electricity. What if there was a toy-inspired device that drastically reduced the price, energy consumption, and weight and was completely powered by human force? The whirligig-inspired Paperfuge does just that, weighing 2 g and costing less than a quarter to produce.

MIT engineers create disease-sensing 3D antibodies

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) chemical engineers have developed 3D arrays of antibodies that have the potential to easily diagnose malaria or tuberculosis. The arrays contain 100 stacked layers of antibodies on the sensors. Other antibody sensors typically only have one layer of antibodies. The design approach relies on thermodynamic interactions that drive molecular building blocks