3D printing and cryogenics could create new potential for artificial organs

Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a technique to replicate biological structures using cryogenics and 3D printing. The research is a first from the university to create structure that are soft enough to replicate the mechanical properties of organs like the brain and lungs. The 3D printing technique could create replica organs and assist

These lab-grown blood vessel replacements could benefit dialysis patients

University of Minnesota researchers have developed a blood vessel replacement made of biological materials in a lab. The lab-grown vessels have no living cells at implantation and could be used as a graft for kidney dialysis patients. The lab-engineered blood vessel replacement is the first non synthetic, decellularized graft that is repopulated with cells using

Medtech stories we missed this week: Dec. 22, 2017

From Hepa Wash’s new collaboration to Stimwave’s FDA clearance, here are five medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Hepa Wash collaborates with GALS program Hepa Wash announced in a Dec. 7 press release that it has collaborated with the German Accelerator Life Sciences (GALS) program to expand its

How modern medicine changed ancient antidotes

Modern medicine is revolutionary in comparison to how different diseases and disorders were treated in ancient times. Without regulation, its no surprise that methods like drilling a hole in the skull to relieve a headache and using enemas to treat asthma were normal practice. With the FDA’s founding in 1906, many devices and practices have

This procedure repairs joint damage and avoids hip replacement surgery

The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center is using a new procedure to help patients avoid hip replacement surgery while still repairing their hip. The procedure, called Subchondroplasty, involves injected a bone substitute material into the hip joint. The material helps fill voids or lesions in the joint. “We want to preserve the native hip whenever

7 medical devices combating the opioid crisis

Opioid-related deaths have become an epidemic in the U.S., garnering attention from the White House, the FDA and many other governmental bodies. From 2000 to 2014, nearly half a million Americans died from drug overdoses. In 2015, more than 50,000 people died from drug overdoses, and 33,000 were opioid-related. Prescription overdoses continue to cause more

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How blocking an immune system response could improve heart attack survival

California researchers have discovered that the immune system’s response after a heart attack plays a significant role in what happens following a heart attack. Following a heart attack, heart cells begin to die, causing the immune system to send immune cells into the dead tissue to clear debris and start stabilizing the heart wall. University

Medtech stories we missed this week: Dec. 8, 2017

From Minimus Spine’s European distribution deal to Stimwave receiving FDA clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Minimus Spine inks EU distribution deal Minimus Spine announced in a Dec. 4 press releasethat it has signed its first European distribution deal with Italian company Moss and

How hydrogels could repair intestinal injuries

Hydrogels have already shown promise creating soft robotics and regrowing skull bones. New research suggests the water-based material could also help deliver stem cell treatment to repair damages caused by gastrointestinal diseases. Hydrogels have been permeating medtech recently – with researcheres using them for tasks as varied as gluing detached retinas back together to stopping bleeding. Now,

Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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How targeting a gene mutation could treat aggressive lung cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a gene mutation that could help treat an aggressive form of lung cancer that is known to be “undruggable.” Gene mutations in the KEAP1 gene could help treat mutations in the KRAS gene that causes certain lung cancer types to be undruggable. KEAP1 mutations occur with

Spinal cord stimulator could curb opioid prescriptions: Here’s how

The first implantation of Nuvectra’s Algovita Spinal Cord Stimulation System was recently performed in Northern California. The FDA-approved Algovita SCS System was able to successfully treat a injured veteran’s chronic pain to reduce the use of opioids to battle the pain. “Following injuries sustained in the line of duty, this particular patient had multiple surgeries

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 13, 2017

From Orthocell’s distribution deal to CorNeat unveiling its artificial cornea, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. OrthoCell inks Australian distro deal Orthocell announced in an Oct. 10 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with Surgical Specialities. The deal will make Surgical Specialities the

7 breast cancer breakthroughs you need to know

As we mark another Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s worth noting the recent strides that have been made when it comes to diagnosing and treating the disease. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women in the U.S. Affecting one in eight women, breast cancer will be accountable for about 40,610 deaths

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