This test can detect when your body is fighting a virus

A test that measures the RNA or protein molecules in human cells is also able to detect when your body is fighting a viral infection from respiratory symptoms, according to Yale researchers. The test involves a nasal swab and could be a faster and cheaper way to diagnose respiratory viral illnesses. “It’s a simpler test

How smartphones can remotely monitor chemotherapy patients

University of Pittsburgh research has recently shown that smartphone sensors coupled with a specifically-developed algorithm could detect worsening symptoms in chemotherapy patients. The sensors offer a way for cancer patients to be remotely monitored. The sensors and algorithm can detect objective changes in patient behavior to determine if symptoms are getting worse. Indications of worsening

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

This orthopedic implant was originally designed for NASA

A patient at the Rambam Medical Center in Israel was recently implanted with a polymer-made ballast that was originally designed for NASA. Roxana Smarsky has a disease that causes the head of her femur to contract. She recently had to have orthopedic surgery to replace her hip that was worn and causing pain because of

How blocking an immune system response could improve heart attack survival

California researchers have discovered that the immune system’s response after a heart attack plays a significant role in what happens following a heart attack. Following a heart attack, heart cells begin to die, causing the immune system to send immune cells into the dead tissue to clear debris and start stabilizing the heart wall. University

Researchers create ultrasound-sensor powered prosthetic hand with individual digit control

Researchers are one step closer to creating a prosthetic hand that allows users to have full control over each finger, according to a new report from Georgia Tech. Researchers at the university say they have created an ultrasonic sensor which allows amputees to control individual fingers on a prosthetic hand, with enough sensitivity to play

These artificial heart muscle patches can repair dead heart muscles

A team of biomedical engineers have developed a fully functioning artificial human heart muscle that can be used as a patch to repair dead heart muscle. Duke University biomedical engineers developed the patch to be used in human patients who have previously suffered a heart attack. “Right now, virtually all existing therapies are aimed at

This artificial cartilage is made using material from bulletproof vests

The same Kevlar material that is used to make bulletproof vests, jackets and gloves now has the potential to make artificial cartilage that could be implanted in the body. Kevlartilage – a material developed at the University of Michigan and Jiangnan University – can withstand just as much force as the cartilage in the human

Zoll Medical, Myant ink next-gen LifeVest dev deal

Asahi Kasei Group company Zoll Medical said it inked an exclusive strategic multi-year deal with advanced manufacturing company Myant to develop technologies for future versions of Zoll’s LifeVest wearable defibrillator. The company’s LifeVest is designed to be worn by patients at risk of sudden cardiac death to monitor the heart continuously for abnormal heart arrhythmias

3D printed organ models are getting way better: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers are taking 3D printed organ models to the next level: They look and feel like the real thing, and integrated sensors help surgeons train. There’s even the potential that such artificial models may someday become the real deal – “bionic organs” used to replace damaged biological organs. The Minnesota researchers published

These 10 medtech companies care a lot about research

Among the world’s largest medtech companies, these 10 spent the largest portion of their budgets on research and development. So what have they produced? Every year, Medical Design & Outsourcing pulls financial regulatory filings and reaches out to major, companies in some cases to create a list of the 100 largest medical device companies in

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River blindness successfully treated using smartphone-based microscope

A California research team has developed a smartphone-based microscope technology that can help diagnose and treat river blindness. River blindness is a disease that is caused by parasitic worms. The END Fund reports that about 37 million people had the disease in 2010 with more than 102 million people being at risk in Africa alone.

How hydrogels could repair intestinal injuries

Hydrogels have already shown promise creating soft robotics and regrowing skull bones. New research suggests the water-based material could also help deliver stem cell treatment to repair damages caused by gastrointestinal diseases. Hydrogels have been permeating medtech recently – with researcheres using them for tasks as varied as gluing detached retinas back together to stopping bleeding. Now,

Diamonds and PET scans can diagnose Alzheimer’s sooner

Yale Medicine researchers have used a new technique involving diamonds and PET scans to look for biomarkers of Alzheimer’s for early detection. The researchers have used a technique called vibrational spectroscopy that involves using a light reflection off of a diamond core to confirm characteristics of Alzheimer’s in blood plasma. The technique was reported as

This artificial muscle can expand 15 times larger than natural muscles

Columbia University researchers have developed a 3D printed soft artificial muscle that can stretch 15 times larger than natural muscles, creating a breakthrough for soft robotics in a healthcare setting. Researchers at Columbia Engineering in the Creative Machines lab developed the one-of-a-kind artificial active tissue that has intrinsic expansion that does not need external compressors