NIH offers $1 million prize in human retina prototype competition

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has created a $1 million prize competition to challenge people to build functioning human retina prototypes to help in the fight against blindness. The National Eye Institute 3D Retina Organoid Challenge is designed to create lab-grown human retinas from stem cells that replicate the structure, organization and function of

17 black innovators who made medtech better

From cardiology to endoscopy to blood transfusion, African Americans have played an important role as innovators in the history of medicine and medtech. To help mark African American History Month, here’s a look at some of their greatest achievements. Here are 17 black innovators who have made discoveries and invented devices to make medtech better.

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Report: Medical device recalls down in Q4 of 2017

The medical device industry saw a 9% decline in recalls in the last quarter of 2017, the lowest quarter since the fourth quarter of 2011, according to Stericycle Expert Solutions‘s annual Recall Index. One of the major causes of medical device recalls over the past five years is that technological advances are rushing at such a

Agilent inks incubator deal with USC

Agilent Technologies announced that it has formed a scientific collaboration with the University of Southern California Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience. The collaboration will help create an Agilent Center of Excellence in Biomolecular Characterization. The new center will be located in Michelson Hall at USC. The research facility will help establish a convergence of researchers

Medtech stories we missed this week: Dec. 8, 2017

From Minimus Spine’s European distribution deal to Stimwave receiving FDA clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Minimus Spine inks EU distribution deal Minimus Spine announced in a Dec. 4 press releasethat it has signed its first European distribution deal with Italian company Moss and

These 10 medtech companies care a lot about research

Among the world’s largest medtech companies, these 10 spent the largest portion of their budgets on research and development. So what have they produced? Every year, Medical Design & Outsourcing pulls financial regulatory filings and reaches out to major, companies in some cases to create a list of the 100 largest medical device companies in

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Artificial organ market worth expected to double in the next 5 years

The artificial organ market is expected to more than double by 2022, according to a market analysis report from Yole Développement in France. The market is expected to be work $1.3B in 2017 and with a consumer annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20%, it is expected to be work $3.5B by 2022. “This impressive growth

Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

Chesapeake IRB, Schulman IRB merge to form Advarra

Chesapeake IRB and Schulman IRB have merged to form Advarra, a new provider of IRB, institutional biosafety committee (IBC) and research compliance services. “By coming together as Advarra, we are merging the highest quality review organizations in the industry,” Jeffrey Wendel, president and CEO of Chesapeake IRB said. “Through a customer-centric integration, we will be

This nerve-blocking treatment could treat asthma and heart failure

Electrical nerve-blocking implants could help treat asthma and heart failure, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University. Niloy Bhadra and Kevin Kilgore, professors of biomedical engineering and orthopedic surgery respectively, have been working on the nerve-blocking research since 2000. The research blocks unwanted generation of nerve impulses in a variety of clinical applications.

Less than half of healthcare professionals think medtech brands meet needs

Roughly two-fifths of healthcare professionals say medical device brands aren’t meeting expectations, and failure to offer flexible contract options is also a problem, according to a new survey from Vennli (South Bend, Ind.). The survey, called “Differentiating to Win in Medical Device Marketing,” polled over 9,000 physicians, dentists and other clinicians to figure out what

How a smartphone app can detect concussions on the sidelines

A new app from the University of Washington could screen for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries from a smartphone. Researchers at the University of Washington are currently working to develop a smartphone app that can detect brain injuries when they happen. The app’s goal is to detect the injuries on the sidelines of sports

Non-invasive cell probing offers new insight into disease progression

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have figured out a way to assess the mechanical properties of a cell using simple observation. Usually, cells have to be probed with expensive instruments like atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers to determine the mechanical properties of a cell. Those methods make direct and invasive contact with the cells. The

Medpace announces $60M stock repurchase agreement

Medpace Holdings (Nasdaq: MEDP) is spending about $60.5 million to repurchase stock. The stock repurchase agreement with Cinven Capital Management (V) General Partner Limited, announced yesterday, involves Medpace repurchasing 2 million shares of stock at a price of $30.27 per share. The transaction is expected to close tomorrow, subject to customary closing conditions. The company’s stock

3D printed living tissue may eliminate animal testing

English scientists have figured out a way to 3D print cells grown in a laboratory to create living structures. Researchers at the University of Oxford and the Center for Molecular Medicine at Bristol were able to showcase how human and animal cells could be printed into high-resolution tissue constructs. Being able to control the position