Tamarack’s GlideWear helps kids with painful skin condition

A company that makes ultra-low-friction fabric for people with burn injuries, amputations and pressure sores has launched a clothing line for children with a painful skin condition. Known as “butterfly children,” these patients have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic disorder in which their bodies do not produce a protein that would enable the skin

Medtech companies need to expand their philosophy: Here’s why

Medtech companies should expand their notion of who their customers are and dig deeper to discern what those customers want, according to health provider- and insurer-connected experts at the recent DeviceTalks Minnesota in St. Paul. Artificial intelligence and the proliferation of healthcare data have made it possible for medtech to consider not just individual patients

Speakers you need to see at DeviceTalks Minnesota

A Google executive whose own heart problems spurred her to seek medtech innovation, a leader at Abbott who wants to drive healthcare value, the head of an upstart company seeking to transform diabetes care — those are but some of the speakers you will encounter at DeviceTalks Minnesota this June. Read on to find out

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3D printing can reduce heart valve leaks: Here’s how

Doctors can use 3D printing and computer modeling to predict paravavular leak (PVL) in patients who are undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), according to new research from the University of Minnesota. One of the common risks associated with TAVR is valves not fitting which can cause PVL. A recent study conducted by cardiovascular fellow

How 3D printed cells on the skin could enable wound healing

Researchers at the University of Minnesota are 3D printing electronics and cells directly on the skin that could create new methods for wound healing and enable biological agent detection. The Minnesota researchers used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a human hand. They’ve also successfully printed biological cells on a sin wound of

How Minnesota got a Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium

Dr. Gwenyth Fischer, director of The Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium at the University of Minnesota, thinks the seven year old group gives their inventors an edge. The advantage could be summed up in one word: “location.” Minneapolis-St. Paul is a major U.S. medical device hub — a tight-knit community of people with product development, regulatory, reimbursement and

Reimbursement is key to Inspire Medical’s strategy

Inspire Medical Systems is seeking to shake up sleep apnea treatment with a pacemaker-like system to treat obstructive sleep apnea; it even has plans for an $86 million IPO. How the company is trying to get its device reimbursed is a great example of just how much things have changed for young medtech companies. In

Boston Scientific, Mayo Clinic back new Minneapolis medtech incubator

Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) is joining the Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota in backing startup accelerator Gener8tor as it launches a medtech focused incubator in Minneapolis, according to a new report from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. The newly launched accelerator will operate under a seven-week program that will support six new startups with a focus […]

These lab-grown blood vessel replacements could benefit dialysis patients

University of Minnesota researchers have developed a blood vessel replacement made of biological materials in a lab. The lab-grown vessels have no living cells at implantation and could be used as a graft for kidney dialysis patients. The lab-engineered blood vessel replacement is the first non synthetic, decellularized graft that is repopulated with cells using

Cardiology research breakthroughs you need to know

Recent months have seen a host of important cardiology research breakthroughs related to new cardio devices and diagnostics, tissue engineering and the overall understanding of heart disease and its treatment. For example,  a customizable robotic heart sleeve – developed at Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital – has demonstrated advantages over other heart assist devices

6 brain-controlled devices helping people regain movement

People who have lost feeling in their limbs or have lost the ability to move them may soon have those sensations restored thanks to a slew of recent brain-controlled device innovations. While we are moving toward less invasive methods such as electrode-filled caps on the head, there are still more invasive implants that are benefiting

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3D printing could make bionic skin possible: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers 3D printed tiny stretchable electronic sensory devices that could enable bionic skin for surgical robots – or a new class of wearables directly printed onto human skin. Their work appeared May 5 in the journal Advanced Materials. “This stretchable electronic fabric we developed has many practical uses,” said Michael McAlpine, a

12 interesting wearables you should know

Wearable technology is probably one of those things you probably didn’t need but still wanted because people were always talking about the devices. Fitbit, Apple and Garmin are some of the main providers of health and wellness wearables. Each of them touts being able to track your fitness activity or measures your heart rate. However, consumer

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Here’s how you heat up cold hearts—for transplantation

A University of Minnesota–led research team has successfully warmed large-scale animal heart valves and blood vessels that were previously preserved at low temperatures. The discovery of this rewarming process is pivotal for organs and tissues that are left in storage for transplantation for extended periods. “This is the first time that anyone has been able

9 cardiology breakthroughs you need to know

Cardiology breakthroughs couldn’t come soon enough because heart disease is the No. 1 killer of men and women in the U.S. About 610,000 Americans die of heart disease per year, and an additional 735,000 Americans suffer from a heart attack. The statistics terrify. High blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking are some of the top

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