Why new battery technology will lead to disruptive medtech innovations

What’s the next big disruption in battery technology? Three experts from Integer, a global leader in medical device outsourcing, weigh in. Martin Cholette, Robert Rubino and Chris Williams, Integer What new technologies in medtech are being enabled by advances in battery technology? Chris Williams: One new technology is the leadless cardiac pacing market. Integer has developed

Keystone Electronics launches new coil battery contacts

Keystone Electronics recently announced that it has launched its latest, coil spring battery contacts that are designed to slide into molded cases. The new battery contacts are engineered using a contact design that can be adjusted to different battery lengths to ensure low contact resistance and connectivity. The also have the option of being drop

Why smaller wearables warrant more powerful microbatteries

Jeffrey Ortega, ZPower Whether they’re detecting a life-threatening change in vitals or helping to manage chronic pain, wearable medical devices have the potential to enhance the quality of life and deliver advanced care to people with health issues ranging from the emergency to the long term. Wireless connectivity and Internet of Things technological advancements are resulting in

Memory Protection Devices touts new lithium battery holder

Memory Protection Devices (Farmingdale, N.Y.) is touting its new CR1632 lithium battery holder that is designed to be used with handheld portable devices. The battery holder is designed with a heavy duty plastic body and battery contacts that meet the requirements needed for medical or consumer type products. They feature a gold-flash over nickel plating onto

Memory Protection Devices expands AAAA battery contact offering

Memory Protection Devices has expanded its line of AAAA battery contacts.  The new model to join the AAAA battery contact selection is part number BK-6223-TR. It is designed to be surface mounted on a PCB and meet the demands of portable equipment. It is ultralight and made of phosphor bronze contact. The new model is also

Keystone Electronics unveils new battery insulating pull tabs

Keystone Electronics (New Hyde Park, N.Y.) recently introduced a new line of battery insulators designed to protect batteries and circuitry from energizing during shipping and storage. Device creators can install the pull tabs in a product along with the batteries so that they can insulate and prevent the batteries from energizing prior to use. Device users simply

How Zeiss microscopes could enable battery innovation

University College London’s Electrochemical Innovation Laboratory is using Zeiss Xradia 810 Ultra X-ray microscopy to study the inner-workings of batteries and fuel cells, Zeiss recently announced. The Xradia 810 Ultra helps researchers to study the evolution of microstructure down to 50 nm resolution. Such resolution offers a 3D picture of the fine details of lithium

How advanced lithium batteries enable medical devices to be miniaturized

Lithium batteries are allowing medical devices to become smaller and more ergonomic without sacrificing power or performance. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Modern medical devices are become increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized, demanding more for advanced battery-powered solutions. Lithium batteries are paving the way by powering a wide variety of medical devices, including automatic external defibrillators, surgical

How Boston Scientific is boosting medical device value

Boston Scientific over the summer unveiled a new value-add for its implantable cardio devices: an online Trugevity calculator that lets physicians predict battery life. The idea is to help health providers quickly grasp the benefits of Boston Sci’s longer lasting EnduraLife battery technology, which the company touts has nine clinical studies and eight years of real-world

BMZ Group opening new center to develop batteries

BMZ Group will open its E.Volution Center next month in Aschaffenburg, Germany. The addition will include 150 developers focused on creating the energy storage systems of the future. Under chief technical officer Dirk Oestreich’s leadership, the company plans to develop 200 new battery systems that can be used in medical products, cars, bicycles and more.

New biocompatible batteries harvest energy from the body

University of Maryland engineers have created a biocompatible battery that uses the same ion-based electrical energy that is present in all living things – including humans. Sodium, potassium and other electrolytes are constantly flowing through our bodies and creating electrical signals. The electrical signals are what power the brain and help control the rhythm of

This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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How to power handheld surgical devices

High energy lithium metal oxide (LMO) batteries enable handheld surgical devices to be small and ergonomic, allowing surgeons to operate quickly and efficiently to reduce fatigue. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Battery-powered devices now span the entire medical spectrum: automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), robotic inspection systems, infusion pumps, bone growth stimulators and other wearable devices, glucose

This could be the battery-free solution for pacemakers

A new energy storage system charges itself using ions from inside the human body – providing an exciting alternative to traditional batteries used in pacemakers, according to researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Connecticut. Researchers at the universities developed a bio-friendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor;