Tamarack’s GlideWear helps kids with painful skin condition

A company that makes ultra-low-friction fabric for people with burn injuries, amputations and pressure sores has launched a clothing line for children with a painful skin condition. Known as “butterfly children,” these patients have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic disorder in which their bodies do not produce a protein that would enable the skin

NextFlex awarding $12 million to fund flexible hybrid electronics projects

NextFlex, the San Jose, Calif.–based hybrid electronics manufacturing institute, today announced $12 million in funding for seven projects in areas ranging from healthcare to avionics to infrastructure monitoring. The funding is part of NextFlex’s Project Call 3.0 and includes $7 million in cost-share contributions from participants. The Project Call program overall has awarded more than

This new material could eliminate motors and actuators in robots and medical devices

Researchers at the University of Hong Kong have developed a new material that eliminates the need for motors and actuators to be used in robots, medical devices, prosthetic muscles, exoskeletons and more. The new actuating material is made from nickel hydroxide-oxyhydroxides and is powered by visible light, electricity and other stimuli. The material actuation is

MicroCare announces webpage for its critical cleaning lab services

MicroCare (New Britain, Conn.) has created a dedicated webpage to introduce its critical cleaning lab services. Part of a website update, the new page highlights what MicroCare describes as unique service that analyze specific critical cleaning applications for electronics, industrial parts and medical devices. MicroCare relies on its research and development to provide customers with

How’d they do that? 7 innovations from medical device contract manufacturers

Charles Darwin wrote, “In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.” Medical device companies get the credit for many innovations, but many need the ingenuity and commitment of contract manufacturers who design and produce the components that make those big splashes possible.

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Johnson & Johnson launches new self-shortening Dynacord suture

Johnson & Johnson through its DePuy Synthes franchise has announced the U.S. launch of its Dynacord suture for soft tissue repair in areas such as the rotator cuff in the shoulder. The Dynacord suture, available on Healix Advance anchors, is part of the DePuy Synthes Mitek Sports Medicine portfolio. J&J launched Dynacord today at the San

Flexcon sees opportunities in the wearables market: Here’s how

Wearable medical device makers need adhesives that keep a wearable stuck to the user without damaging their skin. Officials at Flexcon (Spencer, Mass.) see opportunity. “Flexcon as a company has been focused on the graphics and labels business for 60 years. Now we see a core capability that we have in coating adhesives on films that

Adhesives and medical devices: How to make sure things don’t go wrong

Too often the adhesive selection for a medical device is left to the end of a project. It doesn’t help that there are so many adhesives as to make the choice overwhelming. With so many potential negative outcomes, here are tips on making the right choice. Tony Kaufman and Del R. Lawson, Critical and Chronic Care

3M sticks it to non-sticky medical tape

3M has introduced a non-woven, elastic blend tape that may offer medical device wearers some relief from annoying problems, including wearables losing stickiness and skin irritation. The company says the single-coated tape, called 3M 4077, is water resistant, offers improved stretchiness and air penetration, and can be worn for up to 14 days. It combines adhesive with a

7 MD&M East exhibitors you need to know

MD&M East is a major medtech tradeshow on the East Coast of the U.S., showcasing some of the industry’s latest developments in packaging, automation, plastics, design engineering and quality. The event houses over 750 suppliers with more than 8,000 attendees who are able to network, explore new career opportunities and find partners for projects. The

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Webinar: What can you do about PVCs in medical devices?

This webinar was presented live on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Click below to watch on demand.     Polyvinylchloride (PVC) has long been a go-to material for medical device tubing and other healthcare products. But medtech companies need to think twice about its use now that the European Union is cracking down on the use

Spectrum Plastics Group acquires soon-to-be Adam Spence

Spectrum Plastics Group said today that it has completed its acquisition of Fermatex Vascular Technologies, which is going back to its old Adam Spence name. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. The soon-to-be Adam Spence Vascular Technologies has roughly 100 people working out of two adjoining manufacturing facilities encompassing 54,000 square feet in Wall, N.J.

Braid-reinforced catheter shafts: How to ensure X-ray and MRI compatibility

To achieve stiffness in intervascular catheter shafts, manufacturers often turn to stainless or nitinol – but those materials aren’t suited for MRI. Luckily, low-cost fibers offer a viable alternative. William Li and Steve Maxson, Adam Spence Intervascular catheter shafts are designed to be relatively stiff at the proximal end, to facilitate the pushing and torquing

How SABIC helped develop a non-drug migraine treatment

SABIC recently helped eNeura develop a clinically proven, non-drug option for preventing and treating migraine headaches. The sTMS mini from eNeura is a portable delivery system for single-pulse, transcranial magnetic stimulation. It’s prescribed by a physician. FDA cleared the sTMS mini for migraine prevention in 2017. SABIC’s polycarbonate copolymer Lexan was chosen as the housing of

This new PTFE seal could make insulin pumps and other medical devices better

In dynamic applications requiring sealing at low-to-moderate speeds and pressures, design engineers are replacing underperforming elastomeric O-rings with spring-energized PTFE “C-ring” seals. David Wang, Bal Seal Engineering When O-rings and other traditional sealing methods fail, diagnostic and drug-delivery equipment engineers are embracing a new and more cost-effective way to improve the performance of their existing