Minor orthopedic implant market to be worth $2.2 billion by 2021, analysts say

The minor orthopedic replacement implant market will grow from $1.5 billion in 2017 to $2.2 billion in 2021, according to analysts from The Business Research Co.. The company’s  Minor Orthopedic Replacement Implants report said the industry will experience an annual growth rate of over 7%,  driven by a higher rate of arthritis and fractures. Osteoarthritis

March 2018 issue: Medtech disruptors, Amazon, robotic telesurgery, connected health and more

Is Amazon about to disrupt the medical device business? The word “disruption” is bandied about a lot. But if Amazon does to the medical supply and prescription drug businesses what it did to bookstores, the effects could be truly disruptive to medical markets. Think the commoditization of a wide host of medical products, including diabetes

MD&M West: Here’s what you may have missed

MD&M West is one of the largest medical device manufacturing events in the world, so it’s easy to lose your way on the show floor. Even if you were in Anaheim, Calif., for the February 2018 event, you may have missed a lot. From Omron to Micromo to MedPlast to Apex Motion Control, WTWH Media

8 women medtech innovators you need to know

As we celebrate more women becoming medtech leaders and paving the way for innovation, it’s important to remember the many accomplishments women have already made when it comes to the advancement of health and medicine. X-rays on the battlefield, the American Red Cross, leprosy treatment and more — these advances happened because of women. As

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

K2M leads the pack with 3D printing for spine, analysts say

K2M (Nasdaq: KTWO) continues to lead the 3D printed spine device market with its new 3D printed Mojave expandable cage and its Cascadia family of 3D printed implants, according to a new equity research report out of Barclays. Leesburg, Va.–based K2M presently has a 3D printed portfolio with 10 approved products making up about 12%

Medtech stories we missed this week: March 16, 2018

From Intricon expanding its manufacturing space to Arthrex signing a global distribution deal, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Intricon expands medical footprint Intricon announced in a March 13 press release that it has signed a 5-year lease that will secure 30,000 sq. ft of manufacturing

13 orthopedic products from AAOS 2018 you need to know

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’s annual meeting is an opportunity for industry professional to come together and showcase some of their latest orthopedic solutions, research and technology. The meeting is being held in New Orleans at the Morial Convention Center, March 6-10. This year, a number of orthopedic companies have launched some of their latest

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

9 wearable medtech companies at the Wearable Technology Show

Digital health wearables are increasingly making medtech strides: They can measure heart vitals, temperature and even track when someone falls. The Wearable Technology Show 2018 — March 13–14 in London — is highlighting some of the latest wearable devices in the digital health realm. Showcased technologies include sensors to help orthopedic surgery patients, a watch to

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

This medtech CEO led his company to a $200 million buyout

Guiding a company through a merger or an acquisition can test a CEO’s leadership skills. Here’s how NinePoint Medical CEO, Christopher von Jako, led his former medtech company, NeuroTherm, through a deal with St. Jude Medical. When Christopher von Jako assumed the corner office at NeuroTherm in 2013, the company had gone through two other

Hacking pacemakers is good TV, but is it for real?

Worry less about bad people hacking pacemakers and other cardiac devices. Worry more about them disrupting hospitals’ communications networks. That’s the major message out of the American College of Cardiology’s Electrophysiology Council, which published an article about cardiac devices earlier this month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.  The idea that hackers might

AtriCure beats the Street during Q4, analysts predict ‘growth acceleration’

AtriCure (Nasdaq: ATRC) — an innovator in treatments for atrial fibrillation and left atrial appendage management — is enjoying a rise in its stock value today after releasing results that beat the Street. Mason, Ohio–based AtriCure’s stock was up 67 cents per share, or 3.7%, closing at $18.99. The company reported yesterday evening that it revenue for

Medtronic recalls 48 CRM devices on arcing risk

Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) informed physicians last month of a problem with 48 of its cardiac rhythm management devices that’s prompting a Class I recall of the devices. The recall affects cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators and implantable cardioverter defibrillators that were “sent through a manufacturing sequence that introduced the potential for internal arcing during high-voltage charging, leading […]

FX Solutions opens U.S. subsidiary FX Shoulder

FX Solutions (Viriat, France) recently opened its new U.S. subsidiary FX Shoulder in Dallas. The establishment will help FX Solutions expand its shoulder implant footprint into U.S. markets. As of Jan. 1, FX Shoulder is the exclusive distributor of products from FX Solutions. It products have been FDA approved since 2016, starting with the Humelock II

How Medrobotics’ CEO thwarted possible corporate espionage

Medrobotics CEO Samuel Straface has a habit of being last out the door – a habit that may have saved his company from corporate espionage. Good leadership isn’t a trait that manifests itself only when there’s a team to oversee. It’s a persistent quality that, when managed correctly, requires constant and consistent effort and can

Microfluidics can make brain implants safer: Here’s how

Researchers at Rice University have created a device that uses microfluidics to implant flexible, conductive carbon nanotube fibers in the brain that can record neuron actions and replace traditional implant methods that can damage brain tissues. Rice University researchers suggest that the implant technique could improve therapies that need electrodes to sense neuronal signals and