Murata Electronics touts Nordic-based BLE module for IoT solutions

Murata Electronics recently announced the release of MBN52832 – a Bluetooth Low Energy/NFC module that the company says enables ultra-low power connectivity for data communication. The miniaturized MBN52832 device consists of Nordic Semiconductor’s nRF52832 IC, a 32 MHz crystal for timing and an on-board antenna – packaged into a small form factor. The device also includes

Sensirion unveils new RH/T sensor module

Sensirion will tout its CO2 and RH/T sensor module SCD30 that is designed to sense humidity, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration at AHR Expo 2018. The AHR Expo is set to take place in Chicago, Jan. 22-24. The sensor features CMOSense Technology for IR detection to accurately measure carbon dioxide levels through a dual-channel principle.

Keystone Electronics unveils new battery insulating pull tabs

Keystone Electronics (New Hyde Park, N.Y.) recently introduced a new line of battery insulators designed to protect batteries and circuitry from energizing during shipping and storage. Device creators can install the pull tabs in a product along with the batteries so that they can insulate and prevent the batteries from energizing prior to use. Device users simply

How Zeiss microscopes could enable battery innovation

University College London’s Electrochemical Innovation Laboratory is using Zeiss Xradia 810 Ultra X-ray microscopy to study the inner-workings of batteries and fuel cells, Zeiss recently announced. The Xradia 810 Ultra helps researchers to study the evolution of microstructure down to 50 nm resolution. Such resolution offers a 3D picture of the fine details of lithium

3D printed organ models are getting way better: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers are taking 3D printed organ models to the next level: They look and feel like the real thing, and integrated sensors help surgeons train. There’s even the potential that such artificial models may someday become the real deal – “bionic organs” used to replace damaged biological organs. The Minnesota researchers published

Lemo redesigns outer shell of S Series connectors

Lemo announced today that it has redesigned the outer shell of its S Series connectors with the company’s iconic “chocolate block” look. The new S Series uses the half-moon insert configuration. It’s fully compatible with the existing S Series connectors on the market since the early 1960’s. Both the straight plug and free receptacle now

3 ways to integrate UVC LEDs into medical devices

Adding disinfection with UVC LEDs is a viable alternative to chemicals, according to Crystal IS. Here are three examples of how they can make a difference. Rajul Randive, Crystal IS In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) reported significant progress in many areas commonly associated with hospital acquired infections (HAIs). However, on any

Everything you need to know about medical device creation

Medtech development is hard. Medical device creation can require manufacturing know-how in areas as wide-ranging as electrical components, high-performance polymers, molding and machining – and that doesn’t even include the required expertise in design, regulatory requirements and achieving reimbursement. The good news is that the companies serving the medical device industry have become specialized experts. Through

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Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

How Igus moving plastic components are enabling medtech innovation

Advanced plastic components maker Igus sees more medical sector opportunities. Here’s how its e-chains, bearings and linear systems are enabling innovation.  Igus – maker of advanced plastic components including e-chain cable carriers, bearings and linear systems – has its main medical customers in Europe. But that could soon change. The company plans to sell to

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How advanced lithium batteries enable medical devices to be miniaturized

Lithium batteries are allowing medical devices to become smaller and more ergonomic without sacrificing power or performance. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Modern medical devices are become increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized, demanding more for advanced battery-powered solutions. Lithium batteries are paving the way by powering a wide variety of medical devices, including automatic external defibrillators, surgical

These speedy BD robot arms store and retrieve medications in seconds

It’s not difficult to see hospitals and pharmacies challenged by dispensing thousands of drugs with speed and accuracy. As the number of drugs rises, so do security issues. To address both, the Rowa Division of BD in Germany has introduced two machines. The Rowa Vmax provides for the automatic storage and retrieval of boxed pharmaceuticals

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

Invuity is back with its PhotonBlade

Invuity has reintroduced its PhotonBlade to the market, more than three months after it recalled the minimally invasive surgery light due to “unintended energy discharge” during procedures. The new and improved PhotonBlade includes what Invuity officials describe as enhancements to improve energy delivery and provide optimized illumination performance.  The new PhotonBlade will ship to customers

Why Flex is betting on stretchtronics for medtech

The wearable lab at Flex (formerly Flextronics) reports it’s making strides when it comes to creating devices that are transparent and seamless. “Usually when you think about healthcare, you picture a person in a bed with wires running all around. We think healthcare should be as easy as putting on a T-shirt,” said John Carlson, president