How targeting a gene mutation could treat aggressive lung cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a gene mutation that could help treat an aggressive form of lung cancer that is known to be “undruggable.” Gene mutations in the KEAP1 gene could help treat mutations in the KRAS gene that causes certain lung cancer types to be undruggable. KEAP1 mutations occur with

Spinal cord stimulator could curb opioid prescriptions: Here’s how

The first implantation of Nuvectra’s Algovita Spinal Cord Stimulation System was recently performed in Northern California. The FDA-approved Algovita SCS System was able to successfully treat a injured veteran’s chronic pain to reduce the use of opioids to battle the pain. “Following injuries sustained in the line of duty, this particular patient had multiple surgeries

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 13, 2017

From Orthocell’s distribution deal to CorNeat unveiling its artificial cornea, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. OrthoCell inks Australian distro deal Orthocell announced in an Oct. 10 press release that it has signed a distribution deal with Surgical Specialities. The deal will make Surgical Specialities the

Blood metal ion levels help determine low-risk ARMD patients

A new study suggests that blood metal ion levels can determine patients who have a low risk of having adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD). Patients who receive metal-on-metal artificial hips tend to be at risk of having complications due to ARMD. However, researchers discovered that blood metal ion levels that are specific to the

How a smartphone app can detect concussions on the sidelines

A new app from the University of Washington could screen for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries from a smartphone. Researchers at the University of Washington are currently working to develop a smartphone app that can detect brain injuries when they happen. The app’s goal is to detect the injuries on the sidelines of sports

This paper-based test quickly diagnoses Zika

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have developed a paper-based test that is able to diagnose the presence of Zika virus in 20 minutes. The MIT-developed test is a cheap, portable and easy-to-use diagnostic test that could be used in countries where Zika is prominent, but tests that measure viral RNA in the bloodstream are not.

Medtech stories we missed this week: Oct. 6, 2017

From Intellijoint’s CE Mark to Patrona Medical and Kopis’ new partnership, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Intellijoint CE Mark for flagship hip navigation Intellijoint surgical announced in an Oct. 4 press release that it has received CE Mark for its Intellijoint HIP System in

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

7 breast cancer breakthroughs you need to know

As we mark another Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it’s worth noting the recent strides that have been made when it comes to diagnosing and treating the disease. Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women in the U.S. Affecting one in eight women, breast cancer will be accountable for about 40,610 deaths

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Pediatric cardiac patients have better quality of life with ECMO

A new study has shown that cardiac patients who have been treated for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have had overall favorable outcomes among survivors. ECMO gives breathing and heart support to critically ill children – artificially removing carbon dioxide and oxygenating red blood cells outside the body – while doctors treat other illnesses, according to

This cardiac catheter uses light and ultrasound to measure plaques

Researchers at the University of California at Davis combined ultrasound with light into a catheter probe to view the tiny arteries of the heart. The device uses intravascular ultrasound and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) to retrieve structural and biochemical information about plaque in the arteries to help predict heart attacks more reliably, according to the

Mini lab-made kidneys help track polycystic kidney disease

University of Washington researchers created mini kidneys out of stem cells to help track the early stages of polycystic kidney disease. Researchers created and grew mini-kidney organoids that have a realistic micro anatomy to study polycystic kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disease that causes cysts to grow in the kidneys. The cysts

Exhaled breath can identify bacterial infections: Here’s how

Researchers at Radboud University have discovered a way to quickly detect bacterial infections using only exhaled breath. Humans create ethylene, also known as a plant hormone, naturally as a result of oxidative stress caused by UV radiation and other things. The researchers discovered that ethylene is created when there is inflammation in the body and

Avacen receives Health Canada nod for fibromyalgia pain relief device

Avacen’s medical device designed to treat joint pain from arthritis recently received licensing from Health Canada to use the device for treating fibromyalgia. The Avacen 100 Class II medical device was previously licensed to treat joint pain that comes with arthritis for a drug-free muscle relaxer. Before the device’s new licensing, the only way to

Traumatic brain injury: Transcranial e-stim may help

Researchers from the University of California San Diego and from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System have improved neural function in a group of people with mild traumatic brain injury using low-impulse electrical stimulation to the brain, according to a study published in Brain Injury. Although little is understood about the pathology of mild TBI, the team