Cell stacking technology creates living human organs

Research engineers at Brown University have figured out a way to build tiny versions of human organs one micro-level at a time, and Igus technology helped enable the innovation. Using cells that are shaped as microscopic honeycomb-like patterns, Jeffrey Morgan, a professor at the university, created a method that consists of precisely stacking molded cells and

Cells can be programmed into living devices: Here’s how

Synthetic biologists at Harvard University have programmed microbial cells into living devices that can produce drugs, fine chemicals and biofuels and detect disease-causing agents. A team of biologists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering fit cells with artificial molecular machinery that could sense stimuli like toxins in the environment, metabolite levels and inflammatory

How augmented reality could guide facial reconstruction surgeries

A Japanese research team has created an augmented reality (AR) system that allows them to create 3D simulations of facial reconstructive procedure results, projecting the images over a patient’s face during surgery. Researchers at Osaka Medical College in Japan reported that they have developed and tested the AR system for evaluating improvements of the body

‘Body-on-a-chip’ device screens human heart cells for drug toxicity

Researchers at Kyoto University‘s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences have developed a ‘body-on-a-chip’ device that can evaluate the side-effects of drugs on human cells, according to a study published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry Advances. The device was used to test the toxicity of doxorubicin, a cancer-killing drug, on human heart cells. The researchers found

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 25, 2017

From InspireMD’s Swiss distribution deal to CoreLink’s stackable guide wire launch, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD announces Swiss distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Aug. 25 press release that it has signed an agreement with 1a Medical to distribute the CGuard EPS (Embolic

This tissue paper is made from actual organ tissues

Northwestern University researchers have created biomaterials made from animal organs and tissues that could potentially support natural hormone production in young cancer patients and aid wound healing. The materials, aptly named tissue papers, are made from structural proteins that are excreted by cells and give organs their forms and structures. The tissue papers are thin and

Soft, water-powered robot makes endoscopic surgery easier

Harvard researchers have created a rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes that can sense, flex and has multiple degrees of freedom. Flexible endoscopes fit through narrow passages to reach difficult parts of the body. Once they reach their target, the devices need rigid surgical tools to be able to manipulate or remove tissues. Researchers from Harvard’s

How artificial neural coding could create advanced prosthetics

Researchers are artificially making neural coding to build advanced prosthetics, thanks to research from the University of Illinois. Coordinated Science Lab (CSL) researchers at the University of Illinois have mathematically figured out how the brain times impulses that are sent out due to a sensory stimulus. “There was a major question in neuron function that

New retinal imaging tech promises to help diagnose Alzheimer’s

New technology, developed by NeuroVision Imaging and Cedars-Sinai, is exploring the use of noninvasive eye imaging to detect Alzheimers disease, scanning the retina to identify protein deposits associated with the disorder. The system is designed to look for neurotoxic beta-amyloid protein deposits, which are also found in the brain in Alzheimers patients. Normally, such deposits

New biocompatible batteries harvest energy from the body

University of Maryland engineers have created a biocompatible battery that uses the same ion-based electrical energy that is present in all living things – including humans. Sodium, potassium and other electrolytes are constantly flowing through our bodies and creating electrical signals. The electrical signals are what power the brain and help control the rhythm of

Silver and electricity can kill bacteria: Here’s how

Swedish researchers have developed a way to use silver nanoparticles and electrical currents to prevent bacteria from growing on plastic surfaces – helping to prevent hospital infections in the process. Large electric currents and high silver concentrations are known to kill bacteria but pose a risk to humans. Before the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska

Non-invasive cell probing offers new insight into disease progression

Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have figured out a way to assess the mechanical properties of a cell using simple observation. Usually, cells have to be probed with expensive instruments like atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers to determine the mechanical properties of a cell. Those methods make direct and invasive contact with the cells. The

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

4 ways wearables will transform healthcare’s future

Wearable technology is moving beyond consumer-grade health and wellness devices – the daily step counters and heart rate trackers offered by the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Garmin. “They’re convenient, small, portable and inexpensive, but you don’t use consumer items for life and death,” said Dr. Arthur Combs, chief medical officer at flexible electronics company MC10

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3D printed living tissue may eliminate animal testing

English scientists have figured out a way to 3D print cells grown in a laboratory to create living structures. Researchers at the University of Oxford and the Center for Molecular Medicine at Bristol were able to showcase how human and animal cells could be printed into high-resolution tissue constructs. Being able to control the position