9 wearable medtech companies at the Wearable Technology Show

Digital health wearables are increasingly making medtech strides: They can measure heart vitals, temperature and even track when someone falls. The Wearable Technology Show 2018 — March 13–14 in London — is highlighting some of the latest wearable devices in the digital health realm. Showcased technologies include sensors to help orthopedic surgery patients, a watch to

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Designing wearables: How to make sense of your material options

The medical device industry’s knowledge base continually evolves regarding what works — and what doesn’t — for wearable applications. Gain insight into some material selection considerations for skin-worn wearable design and development. Deepak Prakash, Vancive Medical Technologies In the dynamic wearables sector, medical device makers are searching for ways to translate their expertise into mobile,

Flex partners with Google Cloud on expanded digital health capabilities

Flex has recently expanded its digital health capabilities through a partnership with Google Cloud Platform — launching its BrightInsight managed service that delivers real-time information about connected drug, device or combination products. BrightInsight is a secure, managed services solutions that runs on the Google Cloud Platform to gather data, according to Flex. “We saw the

How Protolabs helped with Whoop’s fitness tracker

Angelo Gentile, Protolabs Competing in a market that includes Fitbit, the Nike FuelBand, and the Apple Watch is no small task, but that’s exactly what Boston-based Whoop did two years ago, bringing to market — with manufacturing help from ProtoLabs — a wearable fitness tracker geared for high-end athletes. At the start of baseball’s 2017

Oticon expands convenience of Opn hearing aids with ConnectClip

Oticon (Somerset, N.J.) recently released its ConnectClip device that is designed to improve the performance of its Internet-connected Opn hearing aids. ConnectClip is a lightweight intermediary device that, when synced with Opn hearing aids, turns the hearing aids into a wireless Bluetooth-enabled headset for Apple and Android devices. The device features a remote microphone that allows

4 ways to make sensors work for mobile health

Healthcare systems in the U.S. and around the world are increasingly turning to mobile health – keeping people out of expensive hospitals and instead treat people’s health problems from their homes. Sensors have a major role to play in enabling the shift. Sensor technology can help make up for the fact that the home, unlike

Most clinicians will use bedside mobile technology by 2022, study says

A new study from Zebra Technologies reports that nine out of 10 clinicians will use mobile technology at the bedside for acute care within the next four years. The company received feedback from 1,500 nursing managers, IT decision-makers and patients to determine how patient care will transform by 2022. The ability to use mobile devices

These medtech companies raised the most VC last year

Perhaps there’s a ray of hope that venture capital funding is recovering a bit for the medical device industry. VC firms invested more than $2.8 billion in 2017, an increase of more than $647 million from 2016, according to the MoneyTree Report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and CB Insights. There were a total 229 deals involving

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CES 2018: Medical technologies you need to know

Updated Jan. 16, 2018 Mobile health devices and wearables have increasingly played a prominent role at the annual CES show in Las Vegas. Health and medical devices touted at CES 2018 sought to improve everything from heart health to posture. Here are 13 companies that exhibited digital health solutions at this year’s show. Next >>

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How startup Nanowear partnered with Secant: It took a year and a lot of meetings

Nanowear, which creates cloth-based diagnostic monitoring nanosensor technology, has entered into an exclusive, worldwide supply-chain partnership agreement with The Secant Group for scaled manufacturing and production of its medical-grade cloth-based nanosensor technology. Under the agreement, Nanowear and The Secant Group will have the collective obligation for marketing the technology and associated products. Nanowear received FDA 510(k) clearance for its remote congestive heart

OKW announces new size and stations for its Body-Case wearable enclosures

OKW has added a new size M and two stations to its Body-Case range of fully wearable device enclosures. Smart and comfortable Body-Case is designed for a wide range of wearable electronics applications including tracking and monitoring; emergency call and notification; and bio-feedback sensors for healthcare, wellness and sports fitness. It can also be used

6 challenges you need to overcome to create a wearable medical device

Before you start a medical wearable device project, consider the following challenges and suggestions on how to address them. Diana Eitzman and Kris Godbey, 3M Skin is unlike any other substrate. It sweats, grows hair, secretes oil, harbors bacteria, constantly sheds old cells, regenerates new ones and changes with health, environment and age – characteristics

This manufacturing method can create flexible wearable electronics

Wearable electronics are useful in measuring vitals and activity, but usually aren’t fit to flex with the body. Harvard researchers have come up with a flexible solution using 3D printing. The human skin flexes and stretches to match how our bodies move. Anything worn tight on the skin needs to be made of a flexible

Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number