Oticon expands convenience of Opn hearing aids with ConnectClip

Oticon (Somerset, N.J.) recently released its ConnectClip device that is designed to improve the performance of its Internet-connected Opn hearing aids. ConnectClip is a lightweight intermediary device that, when synced with Opn hearing aids, turns the hearing aids into a wireless Bluetooth-enabled headset for Apple and Android devices. The device features a remote microphone that allows

This smartphone case monitors blood glucose on the go

University of California San Diego engineers have created a smartphone case that, when paired with an app, can make it easier for people with diabetes to track and record blood glucose levels on the go. “Integrating blood glucose sensing into a smartphone would eliminate the need for patients to carry a separate device,” Patrick Mercier,

Most clinicians will use bedside mobile technology by 2022, study says

A new study from Zebra Technologies reports that nine out of 10 clinicians will use mobile technology at the bedside for acute care within the next four years. The company received feedback from 1,500 nursing managers, IT decision-makers and patients to determine how patient care will transform by 2022. The ability to use mobile devices

CES 2018: Medical technologies you need to know

Updated Jan. 16, 2018 Mobile health devices and wearables have increasingly played a prominent role at the annual CES show in Las Vegas. Health and medical devices touted at CES 2018 sought to improve everything from heart health to posture. Here are 13 companies that exhibited digital health solutions at this year’s show. Next >>

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How smartphones can remotely monitor chemotherapy patients

University of Pittsburgh research has recently shown that smartphone sensors coupled with a specifically-developed algorithm could detect worsening symptoms in chemotherapy patients. The sensors offer a way for cancer patients to be remotely monitored. The sensors and algorithm can detect objective changes in patient behavior to determine if symptoms are getting worse. Indications of worsening

7 medical devices combating the opioid crisis

Opioid-related deaths have become an epidemic in the U.S., garnering attention from the White House, the FDA and many other governmental bodies. From 2000 to 2014, nearly half a million Americans died from drug overdoses. In 2015, more than 50,000 people died from drug overdoses, and 33,000 were opioid-related. Prescription overdoses continue to cause more

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This manufacturing method can create flexible wearable electronics

Wearable electronics are useful in measuring vitals and activity, but usually aren’t fit to flex with the body. Harvard researchers have come up with a flexible solution using 3D printing. The human skin flexes and stretches to match how our bodies move. Anything worn tight on the skin needs to be made of a flexible

Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

How a smartphone app can detect concussions on the sidelines

A new app from the University of Washington could screen for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries from a smartphone. Researchers at the University of Washington are currently working to develop a smartphone app that can detect brain injuries when they happen. The app’s goal is to detect the injuries on the sidelines of sports

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

This app turns your smartphone into an ultrasound to measure heart health

Engineers at the California Institute of Technology have turned a smartphone camera into an ultrasound to non-invasively give detailed information about someone’s heart health. Ultrasound scans take 45 minutes using the machine. Using the Caltech-developed app, the procedure is cut down to a minute or two. Huntington Medical Research Institute engineers created a technique that

Medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 22, 2017

From the FDA’s clearance of Covalon’s film-drape to Bioventus launching its study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA clears Covalon’s MediClear OTC surgical film-drape Covalon announced in a Sept. 21 press release that the FDA has cleared its MediClear PreOp to market in U.S. hospitals,

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

This smart mat can predict the onset of foot ulcers

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology hackathon participant developed a smart mat that helps detect early warning signs of foot ulcers. Jon Bloom, co-founder of startup company Podimetrics, developed a mat that can detect foot ulcers before they happen and reduce the number of amputations occurring. Bloom completed his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in

Medtech stories we missed this week: September 8, 2017

From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating