This spit-powered battery could expand diagnostics in developing countries

A new battery developed by Binghamton University can be activated using spit and used in places where normal batteries can’t be used. Binghamton University electrical and computer science assistant professor Seokheun Choi has spent the last five years developing micro-power sources that can be used in resource-limited regions for diagnostic biosensors. Choi has previously developed

How glass-sealed connectors increase medical device longevity

As medical instruments and technologies grow more sophisticated and complex, it is increasingly important to guard sensitive components from the autoclaving process while supporting their longevity. Glass offers a solution. Jochen Herzberg, Schott Electronic Packaging In today’s era of rapid technological advancement, medical devices have become more complex and capable than ever thanks to the

4 questions to ask when the mold will not fill right

A pressure sensor can be a big help when your mold isn’t filling properly. Here are four questions to ask when shopping for the right sensor. Shane VandeKerkhof, RJG Some molding problems can be diagnosed with a little pressure data from inside the mold. But whether you’re new to molding or a seasoned veteran trying to

Tekni-Plex touting tubing and compounds at Medtec China

Tekni-Plex’s business units will be presenting its latest medical device tubing and compounds at Medtec China. The event is scheduled to take place Sept. 20–22 in Shanghai, China. Natvar is touting its full line of precision-crafted tubing solutions. It will include Natvar’s newest microextrusion alternative for neurovascular interventional therapies and surgery. The microtubing capabilities also

How new chemistry is making medical imaging better

Researchers recently stumbled upon a chemical mechanism that could be used to make radioactive tracers, according to new research from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The discovery resulted in an alternative way to create chemical compounds that are beneficial to noninvasive, high-resolution, 3D medical imaging technology like positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

How WiFi could monitor sleep disorders

Monitoring sleep disorders could be as easy as measuring the radio waves around a patient through WiFi, according to new research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital. Traditionally, physicians measure sleep disorders through electrodes or other sensors attached to a patient. The new method, however, is a device that uses an advanced

This new nanochip technology can reprogram human cells

Ohio State University researchers have developed a nanochip technology that they say can create any cell type for treatment within the human body. The new technology, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), can repair injured tissue and restore the function of aging tissue like organs, blood vessels and nerve cells. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured

Compounding Solutions holding medical plastics compounding conference

Compounding Solutions will hold its second annual MPC Conference on Tuesday, Dec. 5, in San Jose, Calif. The one-day-long 2017 MPC Conference will take place at the San Jose Marriott in downtown San Jose, in the heart of Silicon Valley. There will be experts in materials selection for various manufacturing processes and device applications – as

How slugs are creating better medical adhesives

Slug mucus is the inspiration behind a new adhesive to close surgical wounds and reduce the use of surgical staples, according to new research out of Harvard. Some of the current adhesives on the market can be toxic and stick together tissues weakly. Some can’t be used in wet environments altogether, which can pose a

Qosina offering plastisol Y connectors

Qosina is touting the variety of Y connectors it stocks that are made from plastisol, a material used to make flexible components. Plastisol, also known as liquid polyvinyl chloride (PVC), offers great flexibility, according to Qosina. The material is Class VI approved and BPA- and latex-free. The Y connectors are made through dip molding rather than traditional injection

3D printing is possible in water: why you should care

Can you 3D print in water? According to researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, you can. The Israeli researchers have developed a photoinitiator for 3D printing in water. 3D printing structures in water has always been challenging due to a lack of water soluble molecules known as photoinitiators —

This tiny diaphragm pump could enable medical device innovation

Fraunhofer researchers have created a tiny yet powerful diaphragm pump that can deliver ambient air to gas sensors. The sensors are attached to a smartphone that warns a user of heavy exposure to particulate matter. “Our smart pump measures only 25 sq mm, making it the world’s smallest pump. That said, it still has a

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart

9 battery and power source advances you need to know

In the drive toward tinier implantable medical devices and wearable health sensors, battery and power source technology has been a major stumbling block. As experts noted in a discussion about battery technology during DeviceTalks Minnesota in June, battery innovation in the field is especially slow. Going too fast has its risks, too. Case in point

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