8 women medtech innovators you need to know

As we celebrate more women becoming medtech leaders and paving the way for innovation, it’s important to remember the many accomplishments women have already made when it comes to the advancement of health and medicine. X-rays on the battlefield, the American Red Cross, leprosy treatment and more — these advances happened because of women. As

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Medtech stories we missed this week: March 16, 2018

From Intricon expanding its manufacturing space to Arthrex signing a global distribution deal, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Intricon expands medical footprint Intricon announced in a March 13 press release that it has signed a 5-year lease that will secure 30,000 sq. ft of manufacturing

SEC charges Theranos, CEO Holmes with ‘massive fraud’

The US Securities and Exchange Commission today charged controversial blood-testing developer Theranos, founder & CEO Elizabeth Holmes and former prez Ramesh Balwani with “massive fraud” – charges which Theranos and Holmes have agreed to resolve, according to the SEC. Charges include claims that the company raised more than $700 million from investors in “an elaborate,

9 wearable medtech companies at the Wearable Technology Show

Digital health wearables are increasingly making medtech strides: They can measure heart vitals, temperature and even track when someone falls. The Wearable Technology Show 2018 — March 13–14 in London — is highlighting some of the latest wearable devices in the digital health realm. Showcased technologies include sensors to help orthopedic surgery patients, a watch to

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This 3D-printed device analyzes tissue cells from rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers in New York have created a 3D-printed, portable and low-cost microfluidic controller that analyzes tissue cells and can recognize fibroblast subtypes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Single-cell analysis is a way for researchers to study how cells influence disease and their response to treatment, but there is a lack of cost-effective and user-friendly devices to

The most disruptive medical device innovations of all time

When it comes to disruptive medical device innovations, it’s easy to lose the perspective of history. Here are devices through history that definitely made a difference. Chris Newmarker, Managing Editor and Danielle Kirsh, Assistant Editor Whether you’re talking about surgical robotics or efforts to bring more value to healthcare, the word “disruptive” seems to get

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Qioptiq introduces new X-ray diagnostics system

Excelitas Technologies’ Qioptiq has introduced a new X-ray system lens and camera optimized for spine diagnostics. SlimLine for X-ray Diagnostics featuring Spine Mode is meant to enable automatic optimization of overexposed images. The goal is maximum contrast and visibility of the spine. When it is in its spine mode, SlimLine steadily searches for the interesting part of the picture. It optimizes

This smartphone case monitors blood glucose on the go

University of California San Diego engineers have created a smartphone case that, when paired with an app, can make it easier for people with diabetes to track and record blood glucose levels on the go. “Integrating blood glucose sensing into a smartphone would eliminate the need for patients to carry a separate device,” Patrick Mercier,

17 black innovators who made medtech better

From cardiology to endoscopy to blood transfusion, African Americans have played an important role as innovators in the history of medicine and medtech. To help mark African American History Month, here’s a look at some of their greatest achievements. Here are 17 black innovators who have made discoveries and invented devices to make medtech better.

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Most clinicians will use bedside mobile technology by 2022, study says

A new study from Zebra Technologies reports that nine out of 10 clinicians will use mobile technology at the bedside for acute care within the next four years. The company received feedback from 1,500 nursing managers, IT decision-makers and patients to determine how patient care will transform by 2022. The ability to use mobile devices

Medtech stories we missed this week: Jan. 26, 2018

From Attune Medical receiving FDA 510(k) clearance to Synapse Medical having CE Mark approval, here are some medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Attune Medical gets FDA 510(k) clearance Attune Medical announced in a Jan. 8 press releasethat it has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its EnsoETM model

These medtech companies raised the most VC last year

Perhaps there’s a ray of hope that venture capital funding is recovering a bit for the medical device industry. VC firms invested more than $2.8 billion in 2017, an increase of more than $647 million from 2016, according to the MoneyTree Report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and CB Insights. There were a total 229 deals involving

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Phillips-Medisize’s increased business to benefit Molex plant in Arkansas

Phillips-Medisize today announced a doubling of production for an undisclosed fast-growing medical customer with a take-home diagnostic kit for cancer detection – with benefits for the plant that Phillips-Medisize’s parent Molex runs in Little Rock, Ark. Phillips-Medisize, which is based in Hudson, Wis., did not disclose the identity of the customer, which it described as a leader

How medtech could stop the drug overdose crisis in the U.S.

The opioid epidemic is one of the deadliest problems facing the U.S. today. Through the development of new pain management devices, medtech could be a leader in solving the crisis. The prescription opioid overdose crisis in America didn’t start until the late 1990s, when pharmaceutical companies touted prescription painkillers that weren’t supposed to be addictive.

This test can detect when your body is fighting a virus

A test that measures the RNA or protein molecules in human cells is also able to detect when your body is fighting a viral infection from respiratory symptoms, according to Yale researchers. The test involves a nasal swab and could be a faster and cheaper way to diagnose respiratory viral illnesses. “It’s a simpler test