Murata Electronics touts Nordic-based BLE module for IoT solutions

Murata Electronics recently announced the release of MBN52832 – a Bluetooth Low Energy/NFC module that the company says enables ultra-low power connectivity for data communication. The miniaturized MBN52832 device consists of Nordic Semiconductor’s nRF52832 IC, a 32 MHz crystal for timing and an on-board antenna – packaged into a small form factor. The device also includes

TDK launches AC-DC power supplies series

TDK Corporation recently released its new XMS500 series of AC-DC power supplies that are rated at 500W output power and have a Class I and Class II construction. The new power supplies series is compliant with curve B conducted and radiated emissions with a 6dB margin. It also has a low leakage current of less

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

This innovation could make medical devices even more amazing

CerMet – an advanced ceramic and metal technology system – creates the potential for implantable devices with thousands of electrical channels. Think new options for treating blindness and neurological conditions. Only a few years old, Heraeus’ CerMet is upping the game when it comes to sophisticated implantable electronic devices. “Medical implants manufactured using the Heraeus CerMet

How BioSig is using plug and play as a medtech startup strategy

Startups, as a rule, should have a plan for their technology to grow. But it is rare that a medical technology startup aims to be plug and play, fitting into many therapeutic areas from cardio to Alzheimer’s to diabetes. BioSig’s Pure EP, an electrophysiology signal recording and processing system, could potentially provide valuable insight during

This manufacturing method can create flexible wearable electronics

Wearable electronics are useful in measuring vitals and activity, but usually aren’t fit to flex with the body. Harvard researchers have come up with a flexible solution using 3D printing. The human skin flexes and stretches to match how our bodies move. Anything worn tight on the skin needs to be made of a flexible

Everything you need to know about medical device creation

Medtech development is hard. Medical device creation can require manufacturing know-how in areas as wide-ranging as electrical components, high-performance polymers, molding and machining – and that doesn’t even include the required expertise in design, regulatory requirements and achieving reimbursement. The good news is that the companies serving the medical device industry have become specialized experts. Through

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a

This nerve-blocking treatment could treat asthma and heart failure

Electrical nerve-blocking implants could help treat asthma and heart failure, according to new research from Case Western Reserve University. Niloy Bhadra and Kevin Kilgore, professors of biomedical engineering and orthopedic surgery respectively, have been working on the nerve-blocking research since 2000. The research blocks unwanted generation of nerve impulses in a variety of clinical applications.

Navigating the FDA for connected devices

As connectivity features become increasingly prevalent, developers are tasked with accounting for regulatory implications in increasingly long-term plans. Aidan Petrie, Ximedica Let’s imagine a product that dispenses a drug for eczema. At its most basic, the dispenser is little more than a package for the primary drug container and so falls under some medical packaging

How advanced lithium batteries enable medical devices to be miniaturized

Lithium batteries are allowing medical devices to become smaller and more ergonomic without sacrificing power or performance. Sol Jacobs, Tadiran Batteries Modern medical devices are become increasingly sophisticated and miniaturized, demanding more for advanced battery-powered solutions. Lithium batteries are paving the way by powering a wide variety of medical devices, including automatic external defibrillators, surgical

Researchers build flexible electronics quickly and inexpensively

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created one of the most functional flexible transistors in the world. The process to create it is fast, simple and inexpensive enough that it is easily scalable to the commercial level, according to the researchers. The advance could enable manufacturers to create “smart” wireless capabilities for a number

Traumatic brain injury: Transcranial e-stim may help

Researchers from the University of California San Diego and from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System have improved neural function in a group of people with mild traumatic brain injury using low-impulse electrical stimulation to the brain, according to a study published in Brain Injury. Although little is understood about the pathology of mild TBI, the team

Hoffmann + Krippner and OKW Gehäuse partner for touch screens

Hoffmann + Krippner announced that it has partnered with German manufacturer OKW Gehäuse to develop touchscreen solutions. OKW creates plastic and aluminum enclosures and turning knobs using different manufacturing and finishing techniques like mechanical processing, vanish, print and EMC coating. By collaborating with OKW, Hoffman + Krippner can being to offer modular touch systems. The

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to