TT Electonics wraps up acquisition of Stadium Group

TT Electronics (Woking, U.K.) said today that it has completed its purchase of Stadium Group, a Reading, U.K.–based supplier of connectivity products and services, power supplies, human-machine interface (HMI) and electronic assemblies. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Stadium products are used in applications including medical equipment, smart home, industrial robotics and aircraft cabin controls

Watlow receives UL and CSA certification for Fluent Heater

Watlow (St. Louis) recently announced that it has received UL 499 and CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 72-10 certifications for its Fluent in-line heaters. The Fluent in-line heaters are designed for a number of applications including hemodialysis fluid heating, ink preheating systems, semiconductor purge gas heating and on demand fluid heating. The heater’s small profile allows it to

How to protect medical cables and connectors from electromagnetic interference

Cable and connector experience from military and satellite systems could help pave the way for safer electromagnetic interference control in the medical device industry. Robert Stanton, Omnetics Connector Corp. Today’s medical treatment suites are crowded with increasingly complex electronic devices designed to monitor, display, assist and alarm the staff involved in patient services. The newest

This wearable system continuously monitors stomach activity

California researchers have created an electrocardiogram-like system for the gastrointestinal tract that monitors electrical activity in the stomach over a 24-hour period. The system is a wearable, non-invasive system that provides GI activity monitoring outside of clinical settings while increasing the chance of identifying abnormal activity. It is a 3D printed portable box that is

Ametek offers new UVCP blowers

Ametek Dynamic Fluid Solutions recently announced that its Windjammer 5.7-inch and Nautilair 7.6-inch brushless blowers with universal voltage common performance (UVCP) are now available. The UVCP allows the company to achieve the same performance regardless of voltage inputs. It is a unique feature to the blower industry and allows for one product to be used

This smartphone case monitors blood glucose on the go

University of California San Diego engineers have created a smartphone case that, when paired with an app, can make it easier for people with diabetes to track and record blood glucose levels on the go. “Integrating blood glucose sensing into a smartphone would eliminate the need for patients to carry a separate device,” Patrick Mercier,

Epec launches new customer portal version

Epec recently announced that it has released its newest version of its Customer Portal. The company first released the Customer Portal in May 2015. After numerous usability complaints from customers, Epec’s ERP administrator and marketing team performed a design overhaul to make the site more user friendly. The team completely rebuilt the Customer Portal website

Murata Electronics touts Nordic-based BLE module for IoT solutions

Murata Electronics recently announced the release of MBN52832 – a Bluetooth Low Energy/NFC module that the company says enables ultra-low power connectivity for data communication. The miniaturized MBN52832 device consists of Nordic Semiconductor’s nRF52832 IC, a 32 MHz crystal for timing and an on-board antenna – packaged into a small form factor. The device also includes

TDK launches AC-DC power supplies series

TDK Corporation recently released its new XMS500 series of AC-DC power supplies that are rated at 500W output power and have a Class I and Class II construction. The new power supplies series is compliant with curve B conducted and radiated emissions with a 6dB margin. It also has a low leakage current of less

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

This innovation could make medical devices even more amazing

CerMet – an advanced ceramic and metal technology system – creates the potential for implantable devices with thousands of electrical channels. Think new options for treating blindness and neurological conditions. Only a few years old, Heraeus’ CerMet is upping the game when it comes to sophisticated implantable electronic devices. “Medical implants manufactured using the Heraeus CerMet

How BioSig is using plug and play as a medtech startup strategy

Startups, as a rule, should have a plan for their technology to grow. But it is rare that a medical technology startup aims to be plug and play, fitting into many therapeutic areas from cardio to Alzheimer’s to diabetes. BioSig’s Pure EP, an electrophysiology signal recording and processing system, could potentially provide valuable insight during

This manufacturing method can create flexible wearable electronics

Wearable electronics are useful in measuring vitals and activity, but usually aren’t fit to flex with the body. Harvard researchers have come up with a flexible solution using 3D printing. The human skin flexes and stretches to match how our bodies move. Anything worn tight on the skin needs to be made of a flexible

Everything you need to know about medical device creation

Medtech development is hard. Medical device creation can require manufacturing know-how in areas as wide-ranging as electrical components, high-performance polymers, molding and machining – and that doesn’t even include the required expertise in design, regulatory requirements and achieving reimbursement. The good news is that the companies serving the medical device industry have become specialized experts. Through

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Electrical stimulation could restore memory in Alzheimer’s sufferers

Applying electrical stimulation to the part of the brain that degenerates because of Alzheimer’s disease could improve working memory, according to researchers at Augusta University. Researchers tested the electrical stimulation in monkeys. Using intermittent stimulation, the monkeys things five times longer in a standard memory test. “That takes a monkey from being sort of a