3D printed organ models are getting way better: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers are taking 3D printed organ models to the next level: They look and feel like the real thing, and integrated sensors help surgeons train. There’s even the potential that such artificial models may someday become the real deal – “bionic organs” used to replace damaged biological organs. The Minnesota researchers published

3D printing could make bionic skin possible: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers 3D printed tiny stretchable electronic sensory devices that could enable bionic skin for surgical robots – or a new class of wearables directly printed onto human skin. Their work appeared May 5 in the journal Advanced Materials. “This stretchable electronic fabric we developed has many practical uses,” said Michael McAlpine, a

These mind-controlled robotic arms don’t need brain implants

Researchers from the University of Minnesota have developed a non-invasive way to control robotic arms by purely thinking about how to move them. This innovation is a breakthrough and trumps previous brain-computer interfaces that required implants in the brain to record brain signals and control robotics. “This is the first time in the world that